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Discussion Starter #1
I had the car raised today, engine running, and the 5 speed in neutral.

Both front wheels were spinning.

This is the first time in 3 years I've worked on the 'Lude (was in storage) but I don't remember this happening before.

How could the wheels spin while in neutral? Vibration? Stepping on the brake pedal stopped them and the engine didn't stall or so much as stutter. As soon as the brakes were released, they started spinning again.

Weird . . .
 

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Completely normal.
 

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if it's in neutral, the motor is still spinning the flywheel, which is still engaged to the clutch, which is still splined to the input shaft...

so, one half of the shafts/gears in the transmission are spinning with the motor.

the other half the shaft/gears in the transmission are sitting right up against the spinning shafts/gears, and they are all floating in the same tranny fluid.

with little to no load preventing the wheels, which are bolted to the hubs, which are splined to the axles, which are splined to the differential, which is geared to the other half of the shaft/gears in the transmission, from spinning; it should come as little surprise that the friction and hydraulic dynamics in the transmission who transfer power from the engine to the wheels.

if it does come as a surpise, i suggest taking (or re-taking) a physical science course.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Tks for the responses. I wasn't too concerned about it, just thought it was weird. Never recalled it happening. My Accords don't do this and neither did my Civic.

Thanks for the tip on taking a physical science class. I'll check out my local community college. :rolleyes2:
 

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the internal workings of transmissions are not magic, the processes are quite well defined by the laws of physical science. the answer to the posed question is blatantly obvious to anyone who play a lick of attention during 9th grade.

roll your eyes all you want...insulting the people who paid attention in school doesn't make them dumber....it just lowers the odds they'll give a shit about you in the future.
 

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if it's in neutral, the motor is still spinning the flywheel, which is still engaged to the clutch, which is still splined to the input shaft...

so, one half of the shafts/gears in the transmission are spinning with the motor.

the other half the shaft/gears in the transmission are sitting right up against the spinning shafts/gears, and they are all floating in the same tranny fluid.

with little to no load preventing the wheels, which are bolted to the hubs, which are splined to the axles, which are splined to the differential, which is geared to the other half of the shaft/gears in the transmission, from spinning; it should come as little surprise that the friction and hydraulic dynamics in the transmission who transfer power from the engine to the wheels.

if it does come as a surpise, i suggest taking (or re-taking) a physical science course.

Actually, our trannies are constant mesh.. so the gears on the output shaft are always turning with the input shaft, there are dogs that lock the gear to the output shaft, same basic theory applies though, the gear spinning freely on the shaft will eventually get the shaft turning as well if there is little or no friction on the output side of things....

trip said:
Tks for the responses. I wasn't too concerned about it, just thought it was weird. Never recalled it happening. My Accords don't do this and neither did my Civic.
The other cars are probably autos, right? in that case the park gear holds everything from moving...
 
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