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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,
Yes it is 2021, hopefully some of my 4th gens are still on the road and trucking. Currently rocking a 95 prelude si, bone stock, and recently, like last week recently, ran through it. Virtually a clean engine. Trying to bring it back to its original glory, and the thermostat and gas gauge digital reads have gone dark. Pulled out the panel, and sure as shit, got a burnt transistor. Seeing how a new transistor was 10$, yet a used gauge was 400$, I bought the transistor. My question is: is this just like any other type of soldering? Has anyone else done this? Any YouTube vid will do? Or are there other factors I need to be aware of?
Circuit component Passive circuit component Hardware programmer Computer hardware Electronic engineering
 

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The hard part is typically diagnosing where the fault is, and testing that your fix worked, especially if you don't have equipment for that purpose. If you simply remove the burnt transistor and put in a new one that probably will work, but there could be other issues with a board. It could be there's a short somewhere else that caused the transistor to be burnt.
 

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Yeah, agreed. I’ve been doing research on what causes transistors to burn out, and most of the problem lie with the alarm system. So I’ll be removing that, as it does no good this day and age anyways. (Also, in case anyone else is having this problem, DO NOT try to fix this yourself unless you know what the fuck you are doing. Turns out there isn’t enough clearance to get it out, let alone solder it back in, and ended up having to remove the entire lighting module just to get to it. Do yourself a favor, and go to any cell phone repair store. They were able to fix it pretty quick.)

The hard part is typically diagnosing where the fault is, and testing that your fix worked, especially if you don't have equipment for that purpose. If you simply remove the burnt transistor and put in a new one that probably will work, but there could be other issues with a board. It could be there's a short somewhere else that caused the transistor to be burnt.
 
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