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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The original Author of this Article is Nathan Morris. However, Reps would be nice :).
**I would paraphrase, but last time I tried doing that, I looked like an illiterate dumbass that only understood 1/8th of the overall information... So here it is, straight! Enjoy. Also, to paraphrase what is already paraphrased, doesn't seem right.**

Browsers like Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, and Google Chrome, have a capability to find a certain word. If you've ever gone to Gamefaqs and looked up walk-throughs for a game, you would understand where this is.
If you hit CTRL + F you will open up your "Find Browser Tool" Just type in the Code between the "<" and ">"
For Example: < "SES1" > for "Secrets of the Exhaust System"

This can be helpful when you need to look up something quick rather than scroll down looking for it.
Under this Quote box, would be a Table of Contents along with added Codes to access that subject quicker than having to scroll down.
Code:
Secrets of the Exhaust System............<SES1>
*Hardware of the Exhaust System............<HES1>
---Catalytic Converter(s)............<CAT1>
---Resonator(s)............<RES1>
---Muffler(s)............<MUF1>
---Exhaust Piping............<EXP1>
*Design Considerations............<DCS1>
---Choosing an Application............<CAA1>
---Materials............<MAT1>
---Bend Types............<BEN1>
---Pipe Size............<PIP1>
---Pipe Sizing Chart............<PSC1>
*Considerations by Application............<CBA1>
---Street............<STR1>
---Street/Strip............<SS1>
---Pure Race............<PUR1>

Read the FINE PRINT I added. :)
Use this at your own RISK!
*Acknowledgement - None of the information stated below this underlined statement is of my ownership. I am simply creating an easier means of viewing this information for personal interest and/or gain.*

Secrets of the Exhaust Systems - SES1
In this section you will learn the basics of a generic exhaust system. You will also learn how to improve upon their inherent flaws and to squeeze every ounce of performance from your vehicle. When tampering with exhaust systems, it is very important to be aware of local laws, as in some locals it is illegal to tamper with these systems.

Be sure that it is okay to modify them at all in your area, and what the requirements are. For example, in some locations it's okay to modify anything from the catalytic converter back, so long as the resulting noise emission is less than 96 db. If this is the case in your area, you are held responsible for obtaining proper testing and so forth. Good luck and happy learning.

Hardware of the Exhaust System - HES1
Exhaust Valves
Exhaust Header(s)

We will not talk too much about these two below, however, they are worth mentioning as they are more or less the starting point for our journey down the exhaust tube. When combustion occurs in a chamber, the spent mixture from the cylinder travels out the holes created by the valves lifting and out into the exhaust manifold, or header. In 4 cylinder cars there is only one header, but in any V-style motor there will be two of these.

The next few parts of the exhaust system are the main focus of this section and will involve some relatively in-depth discussion. If you are ready to learn then hold on, some of this may require reading twice or perhaps even three times.

Catalytic Converter(s) - CAT1​
In order to clean up the air, the EPA passed a law stating that all new Vehicles be equipped with Catalytic Converters. The "cats" job is to make sure that the poisonous gases that are contained in raw exhaust do not make it out into the environment (or rather, your lungs), and really do a good job of doing this. The "cat" also does a great job of quieting modern cars down and making the exhaust note deeper.

A lot of people will tell you that by removing this device, by replacing it with some kind of straight pipe will gain you great deals of horsepower. While it is logical to say this due to the idea that it's a restriction, one would be wrong to make this assumption.

Besides being highly illegal ($25,000 fine attached), smelling really bad, and being very loud, it will actually make very little difference. If you plan on replacing the catalytic converter, there are several companies that make high flow converters that actually still perform their duties. These will gain you just as much power, if there is any to gain in the first place, and will keep you legal and safe.

In closing to this section, it is very important to note that a damaged or worn catalytic converter CAN cause serious horsepower loss as well as other problems. Therefore, you should check it's condition especially if your vehicle of choice is rather old. Sometimes a new OEM converter alone can help regain a few ponies especially on 8+ y.o. cars.

Resonator(s) - RES1​
Resonators come in two varieties. One is a true resonator, and the other is a glass pack-style muffler. These resonators show up in the exhaust pipe as extra "canisters", typically between the muffler(s) and the catalytic converter(s). They do not in any way restrict flow, but of course you should match their size to the size of your pipe. Removing them will make things a lot louder and produce a higher pitch.

The reason removing a resonator will make the exhaust note higher pitched, and albeit louder, is that resonators basically take the sound waves from the exhaust and force them outward toward the walls of the resonator. They then "bounce" back and meet sound waves in the center of the pipe, canceling out the sound waves. As well, glass pack style resonators also have fiberglass packing around them to help reduce some sound as well.

You should invest in at least 1, if not 2 resonators for your new exhaust system, unless you are using this for an all out race car and don't mind the noise, in which case they can be scrapped for less weight.

Muffler(s) - MUF1​
This is where a lot of enthusiasts get their exhaust all wrong. First of all, no muffler can give you any horsepower. However, an aftermarket muffler can free up horsepower, being blocked by the OEM (Original Equipment) muffler. However, without doing other modifications to especially the exhaust pipe, this modification would mostly be for looks and sound.

Basically, a muffler's job is to quiet the otherwise very loud exhaust down a bit. Various mufflers do this in different ways. Absorption mufflers are the best at letting exhaust flow freely, however they are terrible at reducing noise. Old school glass pack mufflers (cherry bomb), as well as the new stainless "canister" mufflers are great examples of this type.

Exhaust Piping - EXP1​
This my friends is where most of the power is picked up in most applications. Factory exhaust systems are typically undersized, and far from smoothly bent and routed. Therefore a great deal of gain can be had by replacing the economical solution with a mandrel bent exhaust that is correctly sized for your application.

Many aftermarket systems combine "cat-back" piping with properly sized resonators and mufflers to create respectable horsepower gains. The only trouble with this is the price. Most of these systems go for $500 and beyond. These units also typically use stainless steel as opposed to the common cast iron of OEM systems.

Stainless steel comes with two advantages: (1) the systems are far more resistant to rust and (2) they are far lighter weight, and less weight means less power required to reach a certain goal. These exhaust systems however, are also somewhat generic, so this book aims to help you design a very effective exhaust system for your vehicle with minimal cost.

Design Considerations - DCS1
When designing your cars exhaust system, it is important to first decide realistically what the goals for your car are, and what it is used for. That is what the first section of this chapter will focus on, deciding what type of system to design. For those of you who want a pre made route, this chapter is not for you. However, if you want to get the most potential out of your car, read on to discover the secrets of designing a high quality cat back system.

Choosing an Application - CAA1​
I guess the above paragraph is choosing an application... & design considerations... Hm. By the way. This isn't a book if its 2 chapters long..
Materials - MAT1​
When choosing a material for your new exhaust system the only reason you would not use Stainless Steel is cost. While it does last a lot longer than most materials out there, and is even lighter than a lot of materials, it is very expensive relative to say, aluminized pipe. However, I personally believe that it is certainly worth the extra cost to go with Stainless Steel. Just don't expect it to last literally forever, as stainless steel doesn't mean it won't rust, it just means that it stains less than other metals. This is a "must" for anyone living in the Atlantic Northeast of the U.S.

Bend Types - BEN1​
There are two different types of bends that you will find when you go to get your pipes bent, or when you order your piping. The first type is the most common as well as the cheapest. Crush bent piping is pipe that is placed in a machine that literally bends the pipe and does not conserve the same inside diameter throughout the pipe. Therefore, this is not an ideal choice for our new exhaust system, as just like a car must be aerodynamic; a free flowing exhaust must have very few if any imperfections inside it. You should avoid crush bending like the plague.

What you are looking for when getting your new piping is what is known as mandrel bent pipe. Basically what mandrel bent pipe is, is pipe that is bent on a special machine that maintains the pipes inside diameter throughout a bend. What results is an unrestricted, nice, smooth bend. Ask the shop doing your work, or the company you are ordering from if they can mandrel bend piping for you. Mandrel bent pipes are said to flow 35% more than crimp bend.

\/\/\/\/\/ **UPDATED** \/\/\/\/\/
Pipe Size - PIP1​
When designing an exhaust system, the size of the piping is perhaps the most important detail. Many tuners really hurt their potential a lot in this area, and therefore this section hopes to clear up some myths and set things straight on exhaust pipe size.

The problem with choosing the right size is that it can not be determined from some simple formula, as there are way too many factors involved. Things such as bends, type of bends, resonators, cats, and so on are all involved in making it difficult to simply make some mathematical equation to solve the trouble.

However, we run into a difficulty with exhaust pipe size as if it is too large, atmospheric pressure can travel into the pipe and actually hold exhaust gases in longer. This obviously is very bad, and this is the reason that bigger is certainly not always better. If the pipe is too small as with OEM piping, the exhaust pressure has a hard time exiting the motor.

Therefore we must arrive at a general set of rules, and the following chart is the best guideline that is available. It will get you within a tenth or two of the maximum power than you could get given a certain design. You can't get much better than just to go by this table.

One consideration when choosing a single exhaust vs. a dual exhaust, is that especially in smaller engines, a single exhaust is going to be much lighter weight than a dual exhaust and is therefore the most beneficial to performance. Even if the dual flow slightly better, the weight will offset any minute gain in that case. In large V8s, and some V6s, duals may be a desirable thing.

Pipe Sizing Chart - PSC1​
Displacement ---- Horsepower ---- Single Exhaust ---- Dual Exhaust
....1.5L-2.0L............100...............2.00" (50.8mm)......2.00" (50.8mm)
.............................150...............2.25" (57.15mm).......2.00" (50.8mm)
.............................200...............2.50" (63.5mm).........2.00" (50.8mm)

....2.0L-2.5L............150...............2.25" (57.15mm)......2.00" (50.8mm)
.............................200...............2.50" (63.5mm).......2.00" (50.8mm)
.............................250...............2.50" (63.5mm).......2.25" (57.15mm)

....2.5L-3.0L............200...............2.50" (63.5mm)......2.00" (50.8mm)
.............................250...............2.50" (63.5mm).......2.25" (57.15mm)
.............................300...............3.00" (76.2mm).......2.50" (63.5mm)

....3.0L-3.5L............250...............3.00" (76.2mm)......2.25" (57.15mm)
.............................300...............3.00" (76.2mm).......2.25" (57.15mm)
.............................350...............3.50" (88.9mm).......2.50" (63.5mm)

....3.5L-4.0L............300...............3.00" (76.2mm)......2.50" (63.5mm)
.............................350...............3.50" (88.9mm).......2.50" (63.5mm)
.............................400...............4.00" (101.6mm).......3.00" (76.2mm)

....4.0L-4.5L............350...............3.50" (88.9mm)......2.50" (63.5mm)
.............................400...............4.00" (101.6mm).......3.00" (76.2mm)
.............................450...............4.00" (101.6mm).......3.00" (76.2mm)


Considerations by Application - CBA1
As I mentioned in the previous paragraph, it is important that we first decide on the type of cat back system we wish to create. We will divide the systems up into three categories, one of which we will refer to as Pure Race, Street/Strip, and Street. I will do my best to cover design principals for each type of system.

Street - STR1​
The street application are basically for people who want a little extra performance from their car, but do not want the noise at the expense of a small amount of performance. Truthfully, this is basically the stealthier version of a street/strip exhaust.

Basic Idea of Street Style Exhaust System...
--Maintain Stock Bends
--Replace with Stainless Steel mandrel bent pipe.
+++Adds life to Exhaust
+++Save some Weight

Next Consideration...
--Remain Completely Street Legal.
*Catalytic Converter is a MUST
--Replace Stock Cat with High-Flow unit from respectable Manufacturer(1) see below for details.
+++Extra Sound (Shouldn't be unbearable)
(1) - Remember it's important that the catalytic converter meets the standards for the laws in your area.

Quiet Side...
--Install set of (2) Resonators (at least 20" L. ea.)
+++Doesn't interfere with flow
(-)Added 5 (+/-) Lbs. (Opt. for 1 Longer Resonator.)

Finally, we will round the system out with a good flowing muffler. Now, there are a few good mufflers out there that would make a good choice. Some are cheaper solutions that others. For example, for a lot of Hondas, the muffler(s) off of an S2000 or other high performance Honda would work beautifully. Basically this is a budget idea, that involves finding the muffler of a "higher performance" vehicle in the junk yard. If this is not an option, or you're opting for new parts, several manufacturers make mufflers that are "straight through," but are very well insulated for minimal sound. Of that I'm particularly a fan of is the Wide Open Performance muffler from Magnaflow (magnaflow.com).

Street/Strip - SS1​
Intended for individuals who prefer...
--More Performance on DD.
--Suitable for Drag Racing.
+++Little more Noise
Perhaps breaking a few rules.

First of all...
Optional Device "High-Flow Catalytic Converter"
+++Recommended
+++Legal Aspects
More Details: Silly to straight pipe the catalytic converter on a street/race application. Not only is it extremely loud, but it'll make your car sound raspier, and you probably won't like it. Anyhow, at this level it's called an optional device.

Next Stop...
--The Resonator
+++Recommended 21" or Longer.
+++Maintain Sanity of Driver
+++In 4 Cylinder Models, that annoying High Pitched sound
(-)No loss in Performance, just a gain of 5(+/-) Lbs.

Mufflers...
--More Freedom
+++Preferably, Straight-Through Muffler (Canister or Oval-Style)
(-)The Larger the Tip, Louder it will be.

Pure Race - PUR1​
Pure Race, No exceptions for noise. (Practically)
Great deal of Freedom, Assuming you want to occasionally drive the car.
--Highly recommended against this practice (Explains taking a risk where in some area's you can get ticketed for loud exhausts (CA) or no Cat.)

Firsts..
--Scrap Catalytic Converter/Resonator.
+++No longer needed, Useless weight
--Use Light-weight Stainless Steel canister style or other light weight muffler.
(Muffler for Sanity of driving the vehicle.)
Note - When designing, take every step possible to ensure the exhaust pipe has few bends as possible. Will require your creativity. When decreasing the number of bends, you improve the smoothness of the exhaust pulse travelling through the pipe.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Yea, I got the thing. and while I read through it, about 3-4x. It kepted stating it was a book. I don't think books are 2 chapters long. and are under 10 pages. More like a short story to me...
I'll be posting information on here as I find them, so if there are any new honda or car fanatics out there with very limited knowledge, they can use PP.com as a source to learn about them...


UPDATED
 

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i'm rather perplexed about the code naming for each part? but i suppose it serves a purpose for the full publishment from which this was taken, lol, sounds like this guy would poop himself if he heard my exhaust, header > 2.5" straight pipe all the way back
- amazingly i've never gotten a ticket (knock on wood) and when im up in the 5k plus rpms, everyone tells me i sound like a CBR railing ass
 

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Discussion Starter #7
i'm rather perplexed about the code naming for each part? but i suppose it serves a purpose for the full publishment from which this was taken, lol, sounds like this guy would poop himself if he heard my exhaust, header > 2.5" straight pipe all the way back
- amazingly i've never gotten a ticket (knock on wood) and when im up in the 5k plus rpms, everyone tells me i sound like a CBR railing ass
The codes are just a way for someone to quickly Jump to that topic. Lets say you want to come to this and reread a certain topic. Just hit CTRL + F and it will open your Finder for your internet browser and then enter the code and it will find the letters that match to the ones you've entered...

BlkLUDE5G. That's funny. But i wont go around shitting. It just an article stating what would serve better for your kind of application, and how you would maintain the maximum HP you could gain.

The other day, i was with a Friend fixing his Catalytic Converter, since he busted it cause his integra is dropped SO low. Anyways, while I was at the shop. I saw a 10in. Muffler tip. It was insane.
 

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referring to exhaust size by circumference. unless you were being sarcastic. in that case, stop right now, you are pretty bad at typing sarcasm.

no offense man but who does that? no exhaust/tubing/pipe manufacturer ever sells their tubing size by circumference. length and diameter, sometimes a specified inside diameter and outside diameter. thats something else you can add to your ''secrets" thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Erm, title is messed up.

referring to exhaust size by circumference. unless you were being sarcastic. in that case, stop right now, you are pretty bad at typing sarcasm.

no offense man but who does that? no exhaust/tubing/pipe manufacturer ever sells their tubing size by circumference. length and diameter, sometimes a specified inside diameter and outside diameter. thats something else you can add to your ''secrets" thread.
:confused:

You mean the 10in muffler tip I saw? If you think I actually thought that size of a muffler tip was acceptable... (which was greater than at least 5in in diameter), then you've got the wrong idea. That muffler is unbelievable. I don't see that as any possible application to any sort of vehicle... I mistakenly said 10in around because thats the first thing that came to mind. It is definitely not a 3" tip btw.
Its like the following in quote...
Get both of your hands and make a large circle. (if you don't know how to do this, your retarded :) ) Now imagine a Muffler Tip bigger than this, perhaps twice as big than this. (This was how big of a muffler tip I saw. First thought that came to mind was "Holy shit, thats a 10in muffler tip. Who the fuck would want that shit???")
OR
If your comment was referring to the article itself. I never mentioned a manufacturer selling their tubing size by circumference, length or diameter. I see where I messed up in the title. This was actually suppose to be an informational guide to creating your own exhaust system...and not technically explaining the secrets about it. It does briefly but its more about designing your own system, for your own considered application.

I still haven't typed up the 2nd chapter which completes this entire article.
 

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:confused:

You mean the 10in muffler tip I saw? If you think I actually thought that size of a muffler tip was acceptable... (which was greater than at least 5in in diameter), then you've got the wrong idea That muffler is unbelievable. I don't see that as any possible application to any sort of vehicle... I mistakenly said 10in around because thats the first thing that came to mind. It is definitely not a 3" tip btw.
Its like the following in quote...
OR
If your comment was referring to the article itself. I never mentioned a manufacturer selling their tubing size by circumference, length or diameter. I see where I messed up in the title. This was actually suppose to be an informational guide to creating your own exhaust system...and not technically explaining the secrets about it. It does briefly but its more about designing your own system, for your own considered application.

I still haven't typed up the 2nd chapter which completes this entire article.

if you meant diameter, then say it in your original post instead of something fully wrong. if it was as truly as big as you say it was probably for a diesel truck. ive seen a smokestack big enough to stick a small sized basketball in, probably about 10 in in dia.

and i noticed your intentions of the article.... pretty much a noob guide. if there were any secrets they would have discussed headers, where the power is really made in the exhaust.
 
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