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Discussion Starter #1
whats up guys, I want to apologize in advance for any repetitiveness and ignorance because I am brand new to all of this. Just got a 98 prelude sh with a turbo added to it and supposedly the engine is rebuilt. i absolutely love the car however there are a couple of problems I dont fully understand. I can still get in contact with the previous owner but I would like to get some other peoples opinions on these matters

1) the ecu isnt the proper ecu. im in the process of getting the right one just have to solder a chip onto it

2) as titled, i have these little breather filters where the pcv's normally are and the one on the left is leaking oil. as far as the smoking goes, im getting alot of smoke coming out of them as well as the exhaust.

not truly sure what to do or where to start, any info you guys could give would be very much appreciated.


 

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Opinionated Bastard
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Unfortunately for you, the setup pictured looks... hacked. Both of those ports that have the little breathers on them should be in constant vacuum to evacuate the oil vapors and positive pressure in the valve cover- something that isn't possible to do with the stock vacuum ports on a turbocharged car, since the intake is now under constant compression when the turbocharger builds boost.

Your best solution would be to vent the valve cover into a breather tank or a catch can to gather all of the vapors instead of having it drip and drool all over the engine bay. It's a paramount thing to do when adding forced induction to a motor that was never meant to be.

Blackworks, Mishimoto or Moroso are great choices for breather tanks. And, before you even think about asking "can't I just get a cheap one off of Amazon or eBay instead of spending a lot?", the answer is no. The cheap catch cans work like cheap catch cans, and are hot garbage compared to a quality unit. Gotta pay to play with a turbo car.

Link:
http://www.bwrusa.com/product_p/bwfi-occ.htm


EDIT: Now that I look closer at your pictures, you actually have what appears to be a cheap catch can already in your engine bay- it's the little polished aluminm tank with the two brass nipples that aren't hooked up. That's odd that it would be there but not connected.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Unfortunately for you, the setup pictured looks... hacked. Both of those ports that have the little breathers on them should be in constant vacuum to evacuate the oil vapors and positive pressure in the valve cover- something that isn't possible to do with the stock vacuum ports on a turbocharged car, since the intake is now under constant compression when the turbocharger builds boost.

Your best solution would be to vent the valve cover into a breather tank or a catch can to gather all of the vapors instead of having it drip and drool all over the engine bay. It's a paramount thing to do when adding forced induction to a motor that was never meant to be.

Blackworks, Mishimoto or Moroso are great choices for breather tanks. And, before you even think about asking "can't I just get a cheap one off of Amazon or eBay instead of spending a lot?", the answer is no. The cheap catch cans work like cheap catch cans, and are hot garbage compared to a quality unit. Gotta pay to play with a turbo car.

Link:
http://www.bwrusa.com/product_p/bwfi-occ.htm


EDIT: Now that I look closer at your pictures, you actually have what appears to be a cheap catch can already in your engine bay- it's the little polished aluminm tank with the two brass nipples that aren't hooked up. That's odd that it would be there but not connected.
yeah i know, the previous owner worked on the car himself, so i wasnt expecting professional work here. as far as the catch can goes, no way in hell would i buy a cheap one. couple of other forums i've read said the same thing about catch cans so i really appreciate the link, saved me a lot of trouble of asking where i can get a good one lol.

until i do get the upgraded catch can, do you suggest i plug in the old catch can? and if so any advice on how to go about it
 

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Opinionated Bastard
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It certainly wouldn't hurt to plug in the catch can that's currently there, but you can only plug in one port. I would run the appropriate sized hose from the fitting shown on the left hand side (behind the oil cap) to the catch can's nipple, and then put the "breather" on the other catch can nipple.

You won't be able to hook up both ports to the catch can because the catch can that's in there now isn't vented- the pressure from the ports would have nowhere to go, rendering your valve cover in vaporlock (which is very bad). A 4-port, ventilated catch can is your only solution without adding fittings to the valve cover.

Edit: I drew a diagram for you in Paint lol. Too bad it got shrunk... ugh. Purple lines represent new hose, the yellow shows the 'filter' being moved to the other catch can port.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It certainly wouldn't hurt to plug in the catch can that's currently there, but you can only plug in one port. I would run the appropriate sized hose from the fitting shown on the left hand side (behind the oil cap) to the catch can's nipple, and then put the "breather" on the other catch can nipple.

You won't be able to hook up both ports to the catch can because the catch can that's in there now isn't vented- the pressure from the ports would have nowhere to go, rendering your valve cover in vaporlock (which is very bad). A 4-port, ventilated catch can is your only solution without adding fittings to the valve cover.

Edit: I drew a diagram for you in Paint lol. Too bad it got shrunk... ugh. Purple lines represent new hose, the yellow shows the 'filter' being moved to the other catch can port.
sounds good, im gonna order the new catch can soon, however the diagram you drew up didnt load, says i dont have permission or something.
 

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Those air filter pcv dint work anyway. The pcv cannot suck in air. It's a positive crank ventilation so requires positive pressure forced from the intake tubing and into the left side valve cover.
Connect the left side valve cover vent to the main intake tubing. Then the back right pcv exit to a catch can. Then the catch can to the intake manifold input.
 

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Opinionated Bastard
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Those air filter pcv dint work anyway. The pcv cannot suck in air. It's a positive crank ventilation so requires positive pressure forced from the intake tubing and into the left side valve cover.
Connect the left side valve cover vent to the main intake tubing. Then the back right pcv exit to a catch can. Then the catch can to the intake manifold input.
That won't work- his car is turbocharged. Running a vacuum line to the intake manifold would cause pressure, not vacuum, when under boost. He would essentially be pressurizing the valve cover through the PCV line without the check valve.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks so much for the input.

Anyway I plugged in a hose to the left port of the catch can and put the filter to the right (hoping that was what you had drawn out) but I'm still seeing smoke. Is that normal?

Plus I'm still getting some heavy smoke out of the muffler, I'm thinking there may be a leak somewhere in the exhaust line. Any advice?
 

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So... You've got smoke out the exhaust, smoke from the PCV breather, no catch can, and a questionably built turbo car.

Something says to me rings...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So... You've got smoke out the exhaust, smoke from the PCV breather, no catch can, and a questionably built turbo car.

Something says to me rings...
fml, i was hoping someone wasnt gonna say that. guess im gonna have to check inside the engine then

btw anyone know of a good mechanic in the southern westchester area or bronx who may be able to help me with this project?
 

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fml, i was hoping someone wasnt gonna say that. guess im gonna have to check inside the engine then

btw anyone know of a good mechanic in the southern westchester area or bronx who may be able to help me with this project?
Do a compression test, and a leakdown after if the numbers aren't consistent. No disassembly required
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Also what do you mean the ECU isn't the right ECU?
compression test, got it

sorry, whats a leakdown?

previous owner burned out the original ecu, so he installed a 4th gen ecu... i got another 5th gen ecu and he gave me a chip that bypasses the anti-theft (so he says) just havent gotten around to desoldering off the old chip.

i can upload some pics if you have some experience on these matters and dont mind giving me advice
 

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Leakdown is done with similar tools to a compression test, but actually tells you where the compression is leaking out. There's a few threads on here about how to do one if you search. I believe it requires an air compressor. You'll know where the leak is coming from, be it exhaust valves, intake valves, headgasket failure, or rings.

The bigger issue here is you're running a turbocharged car on a basically stock ECU that cannot handle a turbocharged car. You need a proper EMS and a proper tune in order for this thing not to blow up quickly. The fuel requirements for a turbo car are substantially beyond what a stock ECU is ready to deal with.

You need to get a full list of everything that was done to this car. Every last part. This guessing blind stuff isn't going to get us anywhere. Compression test will tell you if the motor's been hurt. Leakdown will tell you where it's hurt. If all is well on a compression test, then we can start figuring out what you need to do to get this on the road.

This car is 110% not drivable in it's current state unless you really dislike the engine in it, but to tell you what to do with it at this point is going to take some info from the previous owner.
 

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That won't work- his car is turbocharged. Running a vacuum line to the intake manifold would cause pressure, not vacuum, when under boost. He would essentially be pressurizing the valve cover through the PCV line without the check valve.
I meant connect it just like stock. Mine is connected the same way and I'm supercharged. The pcv is a one way system so no pressure from the turbo will be seen. Only coherence is the back right valve cover pcv exit goes too a catch can before going to the intake manifold.
 

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Do a compression test, and a leakdown after if the numbers aren't consistent. No disassembly required
Yup.
compression test, got it

sorry, whats a leakdown?

previous owner burned out the original ecu, so he installed a 4th gen ecu... i got another 5th gen ecu and he gave me a chip that bypasses the anti-theft (so he says) just havent gotten around to desoldering off the old chip.

i can upload some pics if you have some experience on these matters and dont mind giving me advice
You really need to take your car to a reputable shop to have them look into this. You bought someone else's unwanted project that's cobbled together, a really bad move if you don't know how to spin wrenches and work on cars.

As it was said before, DO NOT drive the car.
 

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I meant connect it just like stock. Mine is connected the same way and I'm supercharged. The pcv is a one way system so no pressure from the turbo will be seen. Only coherence is the back right valve cover pcv exit goes too a catch can before going to the intake manifold.
Yeah I don't know if I'd trust that little PCV valve on a turbo setup at all. Something tells me that piece of plastic stops being one way when positive pressure is applied.

That said, the stock PCV system is inadequate for a stock h22 in my opinion, much less an FI car. I suspect that's why there's so much "burning oil" and "worn ring" problems with these motors that's considered typical. Crankcase pressure is the force that fights against the piston rings sealing, and too much can cause the rings, due to pressure, to end up at "funny" angles, thus prematurely wearing them.
 
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