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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
two days before this thread, I didn't even know what Helicoil was. Today, I will show you how easy it is to re-thread a 3rd gen oil pump and rear crank seal, or any other damaged tread related items

supply's needed
1/4 quality drill bit for metal, don't use a wood bit
Punch - I used a 1/8 punch
helicoil kit # 5546-6 or M6x1 this kit contains:
12 coils
Tap
and the coil insert tool


First step is to drill out the old threads with the 1/4 Bit. I used a magic marker to mark the drill bit so I dont drill into the block to far. Take your time when your drilling the block. Nice, Easy, and Slow

Clean the hole out with an air compresser, use the tap to make new threads, once again I used a marker as a depth indicator. clean insides agian. remember nice and easy. (USEFULL INFO courtesy of Reyke: Just a little food for thought whenever I tap something I usually put grease into the grooves of the tap, it helps catch the metal shavings, I found this to most usefull when I had to repair spark plug threads, or put inserts into place on items that you can't easily open up to get the shavings out.)

with new threads in the bolt holes you need to grab your coil insert tool and screw the coils on the tool like this

screw the coil into the tapped holes

with the coil inserted in the holes, you need to used the punch to break off the little tab, and then use your air compresser to blow it out, or do what I did and stick some gum at the end your punch to pull it out. DONE!
 

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Needs Sensitivity Train'n
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See there yesterday you though it was the end of the world and now your better than new and plus you did a nice writeup for everyone. Nice job man.
 

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Hell yeah great write up dude reps for joo, lol, I had to heli-coil some shit at work myself.

Just a little food for thought whenever I tap something I usually put grease into the grooves of the tap, it helps catch the metal shavings, I found this to most usefull when I had to repair spark plug threads, or put inserts into place on items that you can't easily open up to get the shavings out.
 

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goooood job!! I see another coolant jacket block plug with 14mm hex/allen drive like in my oddball and large tool thread. It has a yellow paint inspection line for torque at the factory.
 

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Nice write-up, isnt it recommended to use lock tight, so that the heli coil does not come out?
You can use locktight but its not really nessesary. Once you thread a bolt into it the bolt will pull tight on the heli-coil and everything will stay nice and snug.

My question is: Will this throw off torque specs?? Since he will be threaded into steel insted of aluminum???
 

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You can use locktight but its not really nessesary. Once you thread a bolt into it the bolt will pull tight on the heli-coil and everything will stay nice and snug.

My question is: Will this throw off torque specs?? Since he will be threaded into steel insted of aluminum???
Tourque specs are based on the bolts (size and material) not really what they thread into.
 

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Memento Mori
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Yeah, but now he is threading a steel bolt into steel threads instead of aluminium, so the friction between the threads is going to be different. I doubt the difference is enough to cause a problem though.
 

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Yeah, but now he is threading a steel bolt into steel threads instead of aluminium, so the friction between the threads is going to be different. I doubt the difference is enough to cause a problem though.
Man you beat me to it cudda boy i was gonna do a right up on how to do this since we are like in the same boat and stage in our rebuilds lol, and wow Must is here !!:smilejap:
 

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Yeah, but now he is threading a steel bolt into steel threads instead of aluminium, so the friction between the threads is going to be different. I doubt the difference is enough to cause a problem though.
Yeah I get that but I think (I am no expert and might be 100% vwrong here) as you torque a bolt down to whatever spec the force of the threads acting along the shaft of the bolt (up and down) is what is holding the bolt and allowing it to be torqued as oppossed to the thread friction (round and round). If it is up and down like I think then it doesn't matter if your threading into aluminum, steel, or peanut butter the torque reading on the bolt will be achieved by the bolts resistance to being stretched, not rotated, which is why you have to lube the threads when you do your head bolts - so the rotational friction does not give false tourque readings.

Also another thing to take into account is that most tourque specs are set to place proper compression/pressure on gaskets.

And finally at the risk of getting flamed there are only a few tourque specs on the engine that really matter.

This is a good discussion. I am going to resist the urge to google this and see what others have to say about what they think.
 

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Correct!
Torque specs are for gasket compression (mainly)
It's a good idea to do them all once, then go back over it again.

Basic spec terms...

snug
tight
gutentight
inforlife
stripped

Very fine line in the last two....
 

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Memento Mori
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But if you (for example) torque a bolt into threads with a higher friction than the original it will cause you to hit the torque spec earlier, resulting in less bolt stretch, less gasket compression.

(This is just technical, I don't believe the actual difference between steel and aluminium threads is enough to matter.)
 
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