Honda Prelude Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys I'm fairly new here but have saw quite a few of the third gens with quite a few miles. As far as I can tell if they have been well looked after the b20a will last the longest without a rebuild. I know there is quite a few long time members on here and am curious of some of the highest mileage Ludes with out a rebuild. I know there is plenty of the b21's still going strong too and with the proper maintenance are very likely to last just as long or longer. I have had several hondas over the years and even by today's standards I believe these to be some of the toughest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
680 Posts
Cars are a funny thing in general. They are in there simplest form no more than machinery meant to move people safely and reliably. So the worst thing you can do to machinery meant be moving, is to not move it. The second worse thing you can do is move it. I worked for Honda for several yeas and now work for a leading chain of aftermarket repair shops here in the Seattle area and I'm in one of the leading locations and technical positions in this chain. Being in this position I see a large volume of vehicles from all walks of life from 80's vehicles to 2016 new models. If there is anything I can speak for from my interpretation of day to day occurrences is that maintenance does play a large factor in vehicle longevity. However vehicle location and use are also very major. I see some cars from the 60's and 70's that have been moderately to well maintained that are in far better shape than some cars 2010+ with little or no maintenance. On the same token I see some cars coming from areas of the country that apply salt to the roads during winter, or live near slat water with extensive maintenance history, but are worse off than a 15-20 year old car with no maintenance due to rust damage. While rust damage affects the entire vehicle, and I will not get too deep into it, it affects the suspension system by causing the rubber bushings to separate from the steel shells, causing a bushings that no longer retains, but is able to float free, causing handling, harshness, and noise concerns usually unseen at that mileage interval.
I spoke earlier about the worst thing for a vehicle being to let it sit. While if done right, this can preserve a vehicle, it is often just parked and forgot about. The rubber polymers commonly used on cars are susceptible to damage from the elements. Something as simple as sunshine will rot the tires, some suspension bushings, upholstery, and paint. If the vehicle is left on dirt or grass plants can grow to reach the undercarriage and cause rust damage due to extra moisture. If oil is not circulating throughout the various components, moisture can build up and cause internal damage. Oil circulation also helps to keep seals soft and pliable, helping to prevent leaks.
Also a vehicle that has had proper maintenance but has driven hard will have more issues than one of the same maintenance record driven soft. If an engine experiences higher RPM's it experiences higher stress and higher fatigue of its components. If a car is driven more aggressively it caused added stress to the chassy, suspension, and steering.
So in short, I do see vehicles that with proper maintenance and use, that approach or accede 300,000 miles without rebuilds at an increasing rate. That being said, I am also seeing newer vehicles failing at an increasing rate. On the plus side, where old cars are generally only needing hard tools to repair, the newer cars have been requiring more of my tech equiptmemnt because the failures are happening around 500,000bps and also obtaining viruses from smart phones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Cars are a funny thing in general. They are in there simplest form no more than machinery meant to move people safely and reliably. So the worst thing you can do to machinery meant be moving, is to not move it. The second worse thing you can do is move it. I worked for Honda for several yeas and now work for a leading chain of aftermarket repair shops here in the Seattle area and I'm in one of the leading locations and technical positions in this chain. Being in this position I see a large volume of vehicles from all walks of life from 80's vehicles to 2016 new models. If there is anything I can speak for from my interpretation of day to day occurrences is that maintenance does play a large factor in vehicle longevity. However vehicle location and use are also very major. I see some cars from the 60's and 70's that have been moderately to well maintained that are in far better shape than some cars 2010+ with little or no maintenance. On the same token I see some cars coming from areas of the country that apply salt to the roads during winter, or live near slat water with extensive maintenance history, but are worse off than a 15-20 year old car with no maintenance due to rust damage. While rust damage affects the entire vehicle, and I will not get too deep into it, it affects the suspension system by causing the rubber bushings to separate from the steel shells, causing a bushings that no longer retains, but is able to float free, causing handling, harshness, and noise concerns usually unseen at that mileage interval.
I spoke earlier about the worst thing for a vehicle being to let it sit. While if done right, this can preserve a vehicle, it is often just parked and forgot about. The rubber polymers commonly used on cars are susceptible to damage from the elements. Something as simple as sunshine will rot the tires, some suspension bushings, upholstery, and paint. If the vehicle is left on dirt or grass plants can grow to reach the undercarriage and cause rust damage due to extra moisture. If oil is not circulating throughout the various components, moisture can build up and cause internal damage. Oil circulation also helps to keep seals soft and pliable, helping to prevent leaks.
Also a vehicle that has had proper maintenance but has driven hard will have more issues than one of the same maintenance record driven soft. If an engine experiences higher RPM's it experiences higher stress and higher fatigue of its components. If a car is driven more aggressively it caused added stress to the chassy, suspension, and steering.
So in short, I do see vehicles that with proper maintenance and use, that approach or accede 300,000 miles without rebuilds at an increasing rate. That being said, I am also seeing newer vehicles failing at an increasing rate. On the plus side, where old cars are generally only needing hard tools to repair, the newer cars have been requiring more of my tech equiptmemnt because the failures are happening around 500,000bps and also obtaining viruses from smart phones.

Thanks Luda although I am not in the automotive field, I had a passion for vehicles since before I was old enough to drive. Have paid real close attention to everything on the road. And after some five hundred thousand miles driven paying close attention to the vehicles around me. It is my opinion that the Japanese have some of the most maintenance free vehicles on the road today. My first honda an 87 accord had 338,000 kilometers,211,000 miles on it with very little parts needed. I believe I put one lower ball joint, a clutch, exhaust and brakes on that car. I'm not sure vehicles are on the down swing now because most don't keep them long. Way too many technical advances mean they are that much harder for the shade tree mechanic to repair. Which I believe is what the dealers want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,668 Posts
No idea who has the highest mileage Prelude. My last one went to 400,000 km before I pulled the plug on its life support. I saw a 2nd gen in the junkyard with just over 500,000 km. I suspect many have gone further than that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
338,000 miles - 545000km roughly. Although it's my vehicle now, this car belonged to a customer that always had their vehicle maintenance done at my shop. These people had very little money to do any major repairs but the maintenance kept it going until the timing belt snapped. B21 lasted a good while. Maintenance is key with longevity.

 

Attachments

1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top