Honda Prelude Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A couple of weeks ago I replaced all oil seals due to a camshaft seal leak. I did full timing belt service (tensioners, water pump, all belts etc) at the same time. Somehow I made a mistake and tightened the timing belt tensioning pulley (no 18 here http://www.lingshondaparts.com/honda_car_parts_selection.php?block_01=18SS001&block_02=E__1102&block_03=23098) before I tensioned the timing belt (I tightened no 19 bolt). The car ran for a few weeks without problem (couple of thousand kms).

Yesterday the car stalls. Cut a long story short I can hear the timing belt flapping around and strip the car down. When I undo bolt 19 the tensioner kicks in.

After the car stalled I'd tried to start the car a number of times and it had even fired up a few times (the noise of the timing belt slapping the rocker cover was terrible) so I was concerned that I'd bent valves when the timing belt had slipped.

There's a lot of info on the web about the H22A being an interference engine and maybe it is - but it definitely isn't when not at VTEC rpms. I can't say that it isn't if VTEC is engaged.

With the timing belt off I positioned the intake and outlet camshafts so the valves were open on No1 cylinder and rotated the crankshaft a few revolutions - nothing hit.

Hopefully this should put to rest the debate about if your timing belt snaps/ slips/ tensioner gives out that you need a new head. Unless you're in VTEC (>4900RPMS), you just need to reset timing belt

Other tips which make the job much easier:
- remove side engine mount before removing the middle cover so you have better access to the forward shoulder bolt
- use a 10mm ratcheting spanner with a swivelling head will save minutes. Without it you're using 1/8th turns at a time with a normal spanner as there's no clearance for socket between the engine mount
- A 17mm deep socket makes the side engine mount easy
- to remove lower timing belt cover, take the side engine mount off as usual but undo the two bolts on the front beam (directly under the ac unit)- cover drops out with ease. You don't need to loosen the centre beam rear bolts as per the manual
- use the same 10mm ratcheting spanner with a swivvelling head in reaching the rear bolt on the lower timing belt cover. Reach up from under the disc rotor to remove or install (engine dropped down and side engine mount off and front beam bolts undone). Without the spanner good luck! :)
- put the timing belt on before you put the auto tensioner on (if you're using an auto-tensioner). It's so much easier to then install the autotensioner and tension the belt rather than having it installed and inactive and try to stretch the belt over the intake camshaft sprocket

Lude is back up and running and leak free for the first time since I bought it 5 year's ago - Woo-hoo! :grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
a loose timing belt isn't exactly the same as when a timing belt snap apart. you're not really lucky unless you're snapped a timing belt and still not bent any valves like a have. I even cranked the engine a bunch of times after the timing belt snapped and still no bent valves. this happened on my 3rd gen Prelude that I used to own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,355 Posts
I have had a lucky incident and a not so lucky incident with my car, both at low rpm, around 2000-2500 both times.

First time, crank pulley bolt came off, and the key backed out enough to let the crank pulley for the timing belt spin, so effectively the crank kept spinning and head just stopped. Re-timed it and no problems at all, even with my pistons sticking out .020 from the block. This was with a stock head.

Next time was on my way home from the gym, talking to the wife, and the car just died. Coasted off the road with the clutch in, then tried to turn it over and heard the dreaded sound of compression leaking out when it turned over. Timing belt tensioner had died. When I finally tore into it, found one cam 180 degrees from the other cam, so obviously bent some valves, as compression was shot in 2 cylinders when i put it back in time.

That one had Pro1 cams on the same bottom end.

My last build had a cam gear slip at 7K on the dyno, and that caused V2V contact all the way across the head, still haven't fixed it since July.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I have had a lucky incident and a not so lucky incident with my car, both at low rpm, around 2000-2500 both times.

First time, crank pulley bolt came off, and the key backed out enough to let the crank pulley for the timing belt spin, so effectively the crank kept spinning and head just stopped. Re-timed it and no problems at all, even with my pistons sticking out .020 from the block. This was with a stock head.

Next time was on my way home from the gym, talking to the wife, and the car just died. Coasted off the road with the clutch in, then tried to turn it over and heard the dreaded sound of compression leaking out when it turned over. Timing belt tensioner had died. When I finally tore into it, found one cam 180 degrees from the other cam, so obviously bent some valves, as compression was shot in 2 cylinders when i put it back in time.

That one had Pro1 cams on the same bottom end.

My last build had a cam gear slip at 7K on the dyno, and that caused V2V contact all the way across the head, still haven't fixed it since July.
Similar situation happened to me about to months ago after I got my car back from my build. I had the stock tensioner go out on me so on my way home I heard a wierd noise. Got the car towed back to the shop who discovered that the stock timing belt tentioner had just took a crap. Luckily as stated, there were no bent valves as I did not enter VTEC after hearing the noise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
Been there, done that. Tensioner fail on my 3G led to bent valves, led to the most expensive repair I've ever had on a vehicle to date. The 4thy's due for a new timing belt now, I prolly oughtta replace the tensioner as well, better safe than sorry ya know? It's 20 years old, regardless of having low (138K) miles.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top