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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I'm gonna take off my wheel hub with a socket and a hammer, and I've seen by a few videos on YouTube that theres a collar around the hub when it comes off and it has to be cut off with a cutoff tool.

Do I still have to cut it off if I'm not changing the bearing and I'm only taking off the hub to bang out the studs and put new ones in? Or can I just press the hub back into it after I've changed my studs.

Thanks guys!

1999 SH
 

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You can press it back in, but that requires removing the entire knuckle and a press to do it properly. I've tried with a C clamp style and it didn't work in my favor.


There is always a risk re-installing that back into the bearing.
 

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You cannot press the bearing apart and then back together and expect it to work.
It may work for a short while, but will grind and make noise in short time.

If you need to replace the wheel studs, you need to replace the fornt bearing, as when you press the hub out of the bearing the inner race witll still be attached to the hub. This destroys the seal on the bearing and renders the bearing useless.

In order to do this, you need a 20 ton hyro press.

You can get the studs out of the hub using a cutting disc, and some skill, but you will not be able to reinstall the new wheel studs unless you remove the hub fomr the knuckle.

Also, when you do this, make sure to clean the bearing receiver hole in the spindle, as often times rust will develop below the bearing and eat away the lip of the knuckle.

Buy only the made in japan bearings, (koyo) you can get them from napa, they are about 70 bucks or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
You cannot press the bearing apart and then back together and expect it to work.
It may work for a short while, but will grind and make noise in short time.

If you need to replace the wheel studs, you need to replace the fornt bearing, as when you press the hub out of the bearing the inner race witll still be attached to the hub. This destroys the seal on the bearing and renders the bearing useless.

In order to do this, you need a 20 ton hyro press.

You can get the studs out of the hub using a cutting disc, and some skill, but you will not be able to reinstall the new wheel studs unless you remove the hub fomr the knuckle.

Also, when you do this, make sure to clean the bearing receiver hole in the spindle, as often times rust will develop below the bearing and eat away the lip of the knuckle.

Buy only the made in japan bearings, (koyo) you can get them from napa, they are about 70 bucks or so.
Alright, so I suppose I'll get new bearings then. I was hoping to have my car back faster not having to wait for bearings to arrive and cut off the inner race, but if it's safer then I'll do it.

Thanks for the info!

I also bought a wheel bearing press from Harbor Freight, this is okay right? I saw some people using it on YouTube.

Edit: And I don't have to replace the hub as long as I don't damage it from removing the race right? Or would it just be easier to buy a whole new hub and bearing?
 

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the hub doesnot need replacing unless when you are cutting off the inner race you gouge or score the hube where the bearing slides over.

Ive never used a wheel bearing press, but I do wheel bearings all the tiem with my 20 ton and sometimes, it will take up to 12 tons to unseat an old bearing, so im not sure what to say when you ask if the wheel bearing press will work as I do not know.

Buy a new bearing and new studs and then get it done and you will be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
the hub doesnot need replacing unless when you are cutting off the inner race you gouge or score the hube where the bearing slides over.

Ive never used a wheel bearing press, but I do wheel bearings all the tiem with my 20 ton and sometimes, it will take up to 12 tons to unseat an old bearing, so im not sure what to say when you ask if the wheel bearing press will work as I do not know.

Buy a new bearing and new studs and then get it done and you will be fine.
Alright, only gotta replace the hub if I damage it, and replace the bearing anyway.

Gotcha!

Thanks for the info!

Edit: So if I order 2 of these that's fine? They're Honda OEM.
 

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no, those hub units will not work, as they are a bolt on hub unit..

The forn wheel bearing of these cars is a round bearing unit that is pressed intot he hub receiver in the spindle. The bearing is a donut looking shape.

The largest issue with doing these bearigns is haing the correct size press fodder to rpess the bearing out of the spindle receiver. As sometimes one will have to cut the outer race out of the spindle, and this can elad one to damagaing the spindle it self if one isn't careful.
 

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You can replace the studs without replacing the bearing or removing the hub but it's a bit tricky, it will work though.

The trick is you cut the studs you're replacing as close to the hub as possible. Then, you drive what's left of the stud out using a punch and a hammer. After that you take your new stud and grind a flat spot on the head to the point where you ALMOST touch the splines with a grinder. Then you simply drive the new stud in from the backside. The material you take off will allow the head of the stud to clear the knuckle. From there you just stack a bunch of washers onto the stud and use the lug nut to pull it trough by tightening the lug nut until the stud is seated.

Take in mind this only works on MOST cars not all, I've seen a few it didn't work and since I've never tried it on a prelude I can't be certain. If the knuckle just barely gets in the way of the stud then it'll work, if it seems like the knuckle is obscuring most of the studs head then it wont. I've done tons of Honda front wheel studs this way, as long as you don't damage the splines you'll be alright, a tiny bit of the head being shaved away wont hurt.

Maybe next time I do this at work for the next poor soul that had a tire shop work on their car I'll take pics of the process. Those chain tire shops always over tighten lugs.

EDIT: Found a video, like shown it might be good to have a thread repair kit, just in case but this method can actually save time and money. I've done it more times than I can count and never had a problem.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdZGl-iU-ms
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I forgot to mention the picture does not correspond, I found it by searching the Honda part number of the bearing itself. The reviews state they only got the bearing not the whole hub sorry for the confusion lol. Worst case scenario I'll just go to the dealer directly tomorrow
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You can replace the studs without replacing the bearing or removing the hub but it's a bit tricky, it will work though.

The trick is you cut the studs you're replacing as close to the hub as possible. Then, you drive what's left of the stud out using a punch and a hammer. After that you take your new stud and grind a flat spot on the head to the point where you ALMOST touch the splines with a grinder. Then you simply drive the new stud in from the backside. The material you take off will allow the head of the stud to clear the knuckle. From there you just stack a bunch of washers onto the stud and use the lug nut to pull it trough by tightening the lug nut until the stud is seated.

Take in mind this only works on MOST cars not all, I've seen a few it didn't work and since I've never tried it on a prelude I can't be certain. If the knuckle just barely gets in the way of the stud then it'll work, if it seems like the knuckle is obscuring most of the studs head then it wont. I've done tons of Honda front wheel studs this way, as long as you don't damage the splines you'll be alright, a tiny bit of the head being shaved away wont hurt.

Maybe next time I do this at work for the next poor soul that had a tire shop work on their car I'll take pics of the process. Those chain tire shops always over tighten lugs.

EDIT: Found a video, like shown it might be good to have a thread repair kit, just in case but this method can actually save time and money. I've done it more times than I can count and never had a problem.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdZGl-iU-ms
I also did not mention that I'm doing ARP extended studs so I'm sure I'm gonna have to take the hub off to fit these huge studs on.
 
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