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Discussion Starter #21
I'm just excited at the prospect of an old Honda wagon with the power of a stock Evo/STI... without boost :evil smile:

Maybe not quite the same power (definitely not the same torque, though a 4.6 final drive is in my future), but the Accord is at minimum about 300 pounds lighter than the VIII's/IX's/GD's, and the X's/GR's are absolute tanks, so...
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
I guess this is the unveiling of my custom emblem design, I'm so excited for it! The idea behind this is to take Honda's OEM "Euro-R" spec and use it to inspire my own, one-off trim level. With this project car being a wagon, and with the wagons being badged as "Aerodecks" in Europe, I combined the two to create the "Aero-R." Looking at the details the font obviously had to be right to capture the OEM feel, but notice that while the letters of "Euro" are all the same size, only the "E" is capitalized while the rest are lowercase. It can get tricky trying to imagine two new letter shapes that don't exactly exist with so little to go off of, but I love what he's come up with.

 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
Just a little spotlight on the custom valve cover I had done professionally a while back. People always stop at just shaving the letters off. I had the rear crease shaved, which continues on to the alternator wire cover; and had the holes for the RHD throttle cable brackets filled. Cam gear covers are removed, but this is a secondary cover for shows and other special use (I have an normal cover to use in the dirty air of the streets). Kept the H on there, because I'm proud of Honda's race heritage. Matte black for that stealth-fighter look, and the engine bay, even though the outside of the car will be a dark blue, will be paint-matched.







I'm tempted to bug the guy to fill in the space around the oil cap, so it fits tight like on the K-series valve covers...
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Slowly, but surely, the H22 is coming along. Head's almost done, I only need to get cams and gears at this point. Decided to go with Skunk2 Pro 2s instead of Pro 1s. From what I've been reading up on both cams, the P2 looks to be a better pairing for my 11.5:1 compression.

Got the nitrided valves and hardened locks today. It looks like I'm going to have to go with OEM spring bases, so except for that and the S2 cams & gears, the valve train is all from this one brand so I know each piece will work as it's supposed to in conjunction with anything it's in contact with.



Older shot from soon after I completed the exhaust parts collection. Bought S2 spring bases and just recently found out I can't use them (not every retailer notes that they're to correct B-series S2 spring height for H installment :mad:), so I'll have to sell those:



- "Skunk2 Inside" VTEC solenoid cap & cam seal
- Supertech valve guides & seals
 

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Very Nice!!!

I lve these old accords, such great cars!!

Had one come to our shop last summer for a dyno day, it was blue, h22 swapped and made decent power. Poor clutch though, I changed it for him the next day.

Ill see if I can dig up some pics of his car and the dyno slip.

Very nice, I hope you keep posting about this beautiful Accord!
 

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Here is a picture, the dyno slip is on the shop computer so ill get that later.








Anyway, glad to see these old beautys are still cherished by others!
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Looks good, he's even got the JDM one-piece headlights the CB community drools over. I can't wait until mine is ready for the dyno. These cars are definitely underdogs, but when people care to do them up right, there's just enough aftermarket support that they can hold their own with any Civic or Integra build.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I came here to post the following post, with the header review, but I've noticed that my thread is slightly out of date.

Since the cams, I've managed to pick up a couple more gauges to fill out my glove box...



... and completed the fuel system:



- Rosko rail
- RDX injectors
- Walbro 255
- AEM FPR
- AEM electronic pressure gauge



And now, what I really came here to share:
 

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Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)
PLM Power Driven H-series Tri-Y Header
*Out-Of-Car Review

The original plan was for a Bisimoto header, simply because I am absolutely in love with its look. I still am, and would love to pick one up some day. At one point, I was three days away from getting a real one used (I was in communication with the seller), but just before I had the cash he sold it to someone else. A while later, I was under the impression that Bisi stopped making them new when he seemed to dip out of the Honda scene. More recently I've noticed that the headers (as well as many of his seemingly dropped Honda products) are back on their website, but now they're costing about $300 more than I remember. I'm not paying $1300 or whatever it is for a header I'd only use half of. Then I saw that PLM makes an excellent-looking replica. That is, they did. They changed their design, and not only does the collector look like absolute shit now (not that it would have mattered for me, since I'd change it from a 4-1 to a 4-2-1 anyway to try and fix that weak mid-range), but for some reason they felt the need to add an additional cut to the primaries, necessitating an additional weld. It just looks ugly now, and the whole point of me getting that spaghetti header was for looks. The photos at PLM's website of a sleek-looking header are not current but I've e-mailed both PLM and dealer JHPUSA, and got confirmation from both that the photos at JHP are indeed current. Maybe Bisimoto came after them for ripping off the design and that was how they solved it... just like all those Chinese brands (in any industry) that blatantly rip off the aesthetics of other successful products and get away with it on the grounds that "it's not the same." You can check out that header here if you're interested. For the record, when I e-mailed PLM, I asked if they'd be willing to match JHP's $50-cheaper price. Because on PLM's site, they do say "e-mail me a better price." I did, and they told me to just buy from JHP. There's a company that's interested in its customers :top:.

After that Bisi-rep disappointment, I decided to 'settle' and just get their HyTech rip-off. At PLM, it's listed at the same price as the Bisimoto rep: $500. JHP's got it for $279 shipped. I wasn't about to waste my time asking PLM for a price match! And at that price, I'm willing to take the risk of buying something from a brand that is notorious for hit-or-miss fitment. It's worth noting before I even opened the box that I don't trust slip joints in the slightest, and plan on completely welding this thing up. It's going into a street car anyway.

RANT: Seriously, what is the point of price matching another seller? I'm not just talking car parts here, either, but for anything. At the same store, comparing their own online to in-store pricing is fine. But if I see a cheaper price for the same product at another store, I'll buy from them. Being able to say I bought from a given company name doesn't get me off. It wastes my time. If these companies are going to do anything about price adjustment, they should be bidding for your business and going lower than the competition. I digress...

Straight out of the box, I took some measurements. For the curious, let's go top to bottom.

Flange thickness:




Inlet size:






First step-up diameter:




Secondary diameter:




Outlet diameter:




The tubing is 18-gauge 304 stainless. I would have preferred thicker, since I hear it's good for sound-suppression (makes sense), and it offers an obvious advantage in heat-retention. I'll probably look into local ceramic coaters at some point.

The welds certainly look pretty, but I'm no welder so I can't judge penetration just by looking at it. I will say that when I was taking these photos in my garage, I was using a case of bottled water to stand the header up. At the end, I lifted the water, stupidly forgetting that the header was still standing, and the flange swung down and hit the bare concrete. It sounded like a heavy whack at the time. No dent or chip in the flange, no cracked welds. On first impressions, it seems to be put together pretty well :dontknow:.












The slip joints, as you probably expected, are where things get bad. I've wrestled with it, I've taken a dead-blow to it, I've tried lubricating the metal with engine oil, and I've tried adjusting the joints in tiny amounts and assembling them in different orders. As a whole, the pieces aren't all aligning. You have to wonder if they weld it all up while it's even assembled. With mine, I think the problem is in the middle pieces that bend to go under the oil pan. It looks like one of the female tubes wasn't welded onto the collector at the right angle.

Here are some photos of that problem, off and on the engine, given that the secondaries are properly seated into the primaries. You can see that not only are they at different angles, but also slightly different positions in terms of how far back they reach - not that that would matter much hidden inside the slip joint, but the difference is there to show how far off the 4-into-2 collectors are.






Left as-is, I can get the final collector on about half an inch. It's enough to weld, sure, but eventually you know that stress is going to crack a weld somewhere. Rather than trying to deal with a replacement header, I think I can fix this myself by cutting a narrow pie-cut relief into the bottom of that one tube that hangs lower... or the top of the higher one... or both... whichever. That should free up some movement in the joint and get rid of any stress. From there, it can be sealed up through welding.

These photos are also starting to show off the over-abundance of oil pan clearance...






Bringing the secondaries closer to the oil pan is an easy fix. I'm sure I can pick up a cheap pipe cutter from Harbor Freight or somewhere and take about 3/4" out of those first slip joints.




On a personal note, I want to swap out that final collector. For one, it doesn't provide any choke to benefit scavenging (at least, from what I've read on collector choke). Second, I have a V-band clamp to replace the donut flange. And third, I'll be using both the stock O2 sensor as well as a wide-band sensor for an A/F gauge, and I want a bit more spacing between the two sensors than the current tube allows for with its O2 bung already welded into the middle of it.

Still, she's looking pretty, ain't she? I've only got a few more parts to pick up for this build, then it's on to some fairly serious saving for machining, tuning, and of course the perfect wagon to put this in...





(The eagle-eyed will notice that the slip joints in the primaries aren't even for when I took the photo; I've tried messing with the header's assembly, putting it together in different orders and changing up the positions of the pieces ever so slightly, hoping to correct the slight unevenness of the pipes before they finally merge into one. Nothing was helping, and I happened to take the photos in that position. The mentioned modifications will be done soon to make this fit together without stressing any welds...)


The great news is that I've now got two headers to compare on the dyno: this, and Spoon primaries on a stock down pipe (or a nicer aftermarket dp if I can find one that's compatible) with 2.5" collector mod. The Spoon primaries are shorties, just like you'd get from brands like DC Sports and Megan, and with the 2.5" collector it should be on more even footing with the PLM. I think the differences in power band will be interesting to see.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I've got the tubes taped off where I'm going to cut them to hug the oil pan tighter, but I'll do that another day. For now, I just drilled the 5/8" hole for the EGT probe bung. I'll get it welded sooner or later. Gauge kit (AEM) seems to have come with enough wiring that I can run it through the alternator wire cover and integrate it into the engine harness and still reach the glove box, at least. The cost of four gauges is a bit much for me, so I went with what I'm consistently finding to be the hottest cylinder on Honda 4s in general: #3.

I'm definitely NOT drilling into the Spoon header. If that affects the ability to tune to its full potential for a header comparison, so be it. That thing is too rare.









 

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Discussion Starter #34
Just found a spare head in the junkyard. There are a couple nicks in the head gasket surface I'm wondering about, but between machining and the gasket, they should be fine. The cleanliness of the thing makes me think it was rebuilt not too long before being impounded (there didn't look to be anything wrong with the car for it to be in a junkyard in the first place).



 

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Discussion Starter #35
The last of the parts for this H22 build are finally in hand! Here are a couple parts that arrived the other day, plus the valve cover from that spare head that I painted. Wiseco 11.5:1 pistons are on order, but they're having to be made fresh and will be shipped in about a week and a half to two weeks. I've got some personal things to take care of over the winter, and then I'll be doing what I can to get this driving by the end of summer...





 

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Discussion Starter #39
2.6 year bump, haha.

Lots of issues held up this project (anyone ever have a roommate decide to start using meth instead of paying bills? Anyway...), but it's finally finishing up. I picked up the chassis, a '93 Accord EX wagon, in January, then sent the engine to the machine shops in February. Since then I've been working on restoring and improving little things on the car itself, and then last Monday I finally got the head back from Heads By Drew in Aurora, CO. I took the block to PFI Speed for re-sleeving, who have their own go-to machinist they sent it to; I got the email that it's ready and will be picking that up tomorrow.

With this head, the Supertech guides I bought were ditched and Drew instead installed his preferred GSC Power Division B-series guides (bronze manganese). He showed me how the Supertechs weren't big enough where the valve seals fitted onto them to really grab the seals - you could pull the things back off by hand. Plus, the tip that sticks into the intake/exhaust ports is a bit more rounded and aerodynamic. My old Bisimoto thermal intake manifold gasket also became brittle and broke, so I've got a Hondata gasket on order. Drew went ahead and took care of assembly and even setting valve lash for me; all I have to do is pull the cams (cap bolts were left hand tight), bolt it to the block, and it's ready for cam degreeing.










I'm hoping I'll have this running and then tuned at PFI in about two months; I did more resto-modding on the chassis than originally planned and overshot my budget a bit.
 

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2.6 year bump, haha.

Lots of issues held up this project (anyone ever have a roommate decide to start using meth instead of paying bills? Anyway...), but it's finally finishing up. I picked up the chassis, a '93 Accord EX wagon, in January, then sent the engine to the machine shops in February. Since then I've been working on restoring and improving little things on the car itself, and then last Monday I finally got the head back from Heads By Drew in Aurora, CO. I took the block to PFI Speed for re-sleeving, who have their own go-to machinist they sent it to; I got the email that it's ready and will be picking that up tomorrow.

With this head, the Supertech guides I bought were ditched and Drew instead installed his preferred GSC Power Division B-series guides (bronze manganese). He showed me how the Supertechs weren't big enough where the valve seals fitted onto them to really grab the seals - you could pull the things back off by hand. Plus, the tip that sticks into the intake/exhaust ports is a bit more rounded and aerodynamic. My old Bisimoto thermal intake manifold gasket also became brittle and broke, so I've got a Hondata gasket on order. Drew went ahead and took care of assembly and even setting valve lash for me; all I have to do is pull the cams (cap bolts were left hand tight), bolt it to the block, and it's ready for cam degreeing.










I'm hoping I'll have this running and then tuned at PFI in about two months; I did more resto-modding on the chassis than originally planned and overshot my budget a bit.
That’s looking very nice! By the way we all overshot our budgets .....
 
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