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This super easy brake upgrade requires no special tools and can be done with the most basic knowledge of car maintenance. Using all Honda parts you will go from 11.1" to 11.8" rotors and can still retain factory 16" wheels.

Parts list:
-99-04 Acura RL front brake rotors
-99-04 RL brake caliper bracket
-99-04 RL brake pads

The caliper bracket and pads can also come from any TL, CL, TSX, or Accord with 11.8" brake rotors. However, the RL rotors are the only ones with a 70mm hub bore. All the others are 64mm and would require grinding out the center to fit. Your factory calipers bolt right onto the new brackets so you don't have to worry about bleeding the brakes when you are done.

Necessary tools:
-jack
-jack stands
-12mm, 14mm, 17mm, 19mm sockets or wrenches
-c clamp or large channel lock pliers
-phillips screw driver
-brake cleaner

1) Park your car on level ground, lift with jack, and support with jack stands.
2) Remove wheels.
3) Remove one 12mm bolt holding the brake line to the knuckle.
4) Remove two 14mm bolts holding caliper to bracket and set the caliper out of the way, being careful not to let it hang from the line.
5) Remove two 17mm bolts holding caliper bracket to knuckle.
6) Remove two phillips screws from the brake rotor and remove the brake rotor.

By now everything should look like this:



7) The only modification required for this upgrade is to bend the dust shield in the areas noted by the red arrows. Two spots by the caliper bracket mount and one at the 12 and 6 o'clock positions. Without these bends, the bracket will not slide on and/or the rotor will rub the dust shield.
8) Clean new rotor with brake cleaner to remove oils, install, and secure with screws. Spin the rotor back and forth and check that it doesn't rub the dust shield.
9) Install caliper bracket.



10) Carefully compress caliper piston with c clamp or large channel locks.
11) There is a metal spring clip in the middle of the caliper. Pop it out and toss it aside
12) Install brake pads into caliper bracket.
13) Attach caliper to bracket
14) Reattach the brake line to the knuckle
15) Pump brake pedal several times until firm



16) Install wheels
17) Lift car and remove jack stands
18 ) Lower car, make sure the wheels are tight, and test drive.

Be sure to follow your brake pad manufacturer's instructions for proper pad break in
 

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Vrooom PSHHHH
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That's awesome! Great post
 

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:megusta:
This would be such beautiful overkill on a 3rd gen…
 

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Opinionated Bastard
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So... the whole point of this swap was to get a rotor that's slightly larger?

I can't imagine that will help your braking power that much, you're not clamping the rotor any harder than the OE rotor, and you still have the same surface area of brake pad making contact.
 

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It's not about peak braking power. It's about a bigger heatsink. Besides the larger diameter, these rotors are also 28mm thick instead of 23mm. That's a lot of extra steel available to hold heat.

Moving the pad further outward on the rotor does theoretically give it more leverage over the hub, but realistically this just reduces the effort required at the pedal to lock up your wheels. Stock brakes can probably do so just fine.

It's extra unsprung and rotating weight to carry around, too. Not everyone needs it or can benefit from it.
 

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Super Moderator
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Haven't people been doing acura conversions for awhile now?

I agree with mlm, larger rotor doesn't do much besides maybe increased surface area for heat to disperse.
 

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Opinionated Bastard
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It's not about peak braking power. It's about a bigger heatsink. Besides the larger diameter, these rotors are also 28mm thick instead of 23mm. That's a lot of extra steel available to hold heat.

Moving the pad further outward on the rotor does theoretically give it more leverage over the hub, but realistically this just reduces the effort required at the pedal to lock up your wheels. Stock brakes can probably do so just fine.

It's extra unsprung and rotating weight to carry around, too. Not everyone needs it or can benefit from it.
Pretty much what I was thinking... that's a handful of unsprung weight added with not a huge return. You could probably get the same results with a quality rotor and a good set of pads.

I know my Hawk HPS pads and Brembo rotors are enough to almost give me reverse whiplash. :lol:
 

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Props to the gyuy for doing it and making a wicked detialed thread about it it in any case. Its no like this site has a ton going on anymore anyway, so i guess every bit of interest is a good thing.


I could see this working for a situation when one is in a pinch, cannot afford to buy the higher end stuffs but has to replace his/her brakes and has access to a well endowed wrecker/breaker yard.

Whats the pistion diameter difference betwen the two calipers, as if there is an increase in piston size, then the brakes may have a slight perfomrance benefit aside from dissapation of heat. Does anyone know whether there is a difference in numb er of anbd or size of pistons in the calipers?



edit: nevermind, he used his stock calipers. I thoguh eh switched em out. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Props to the gyuy for doing it and making a wicked detialed thread about it it in any case. Its no like this site has a ton going on anymore anyway, so i guess every bit of interest is a good thing.


I could see this working for a situation when one is in a pinch, cannot afford to buy the higher end stuffs but has to replace his/her brakes and has access to a well endowed wrecker/breaker yard.

Whats the pistion diameter difference betwen the two calipers, as if there is an increase in piston size, then the brakes may have a slight perfomrance benefit aside from dissapation of heat. Does anyone know whether there is a difference in numb er of anbd or size of pistons in the calipers?



edit: nevermind, he used his stock calipers. I thoguh eh switched em out. lol
I did reuse my factory calipers, but the Acura calipers have the same 57mm piston as our cars. It's the same caliper, but different manufacturer, so cross reference didn't bring that info to me. I didn't know until I held them both in my hands.

Anyway, I figured if the S2000, RSX, Civic Si, Accord, TSX, TL, CL, RL all have 11.8" (or larger on some models) that it would be some benefit to us. The pads may not be any better, but the larger, thicker rotor will dissipate heat better and resist warping. I needed new pads and rotors anyway, so the only extra cost to me was for the brackets
 

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It's a cool upgrade for just the cost of brackets. I would probably do it too if I had a 5th gen needing rotors and pads.
 

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Vrooom PSHHHH
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Larger rotors are definitely worth upgrading to! As mentioned above, it's not all about pad surface area. Larger rotors take longer to heat up and will also dissipate heat faster. You would never tell the difference between the two during normal driving. Take it to a track and they will hold up to abuse much better and will take longer to overheat
 

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I might get this done in a couple months when I'm back home, if I can find a place to re-drill RL rotors back to 4x114.

Thanks for the awsome write-up! :beer:
 
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