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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Hey guys

So I got a "brand new" alternator which turned out to be a re-manufactured one. The shitty retailer spin that it's 'brand new' because the parts are inside are new. Bull shit.. but anyway..

After I install the alternator, I will need to adjust the alternator belt. The shop manual (16-75) states in step 1 that one needs to apply a force of 98 nM and measure the deflection between the alternator and the crankshaft pulley...


Does anyone know where am I suppose to apply the force?
 

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Apply force to the belt between the pulleys - that's what it's referring to when it say to measure belt deflection. 10 - 12mm is about the size of an average fingernail, tip to cuticle. The diagram on page 8 of the section you posted shows exactly where to do it. Adjust your tension so that when you push on the outer surface of the belt it deflects to what the manual says. You'd have to have a force gauge to determine the exact amount of force to apply, and none of us own one of those. Pushing on the belt pretty hard with your thumb should be enough - 22lbs of force isn't a huge amount - more than a touch, but less than the amount of force it would take to move a snug bolt. Use your best judgement. If you adjust it and it still squeals a little when you start it up, tighten it a bit more before you call it a day, then try it again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 · (Edited)
Hmmm. I didn't know there were such things as a force gauge. I saw '98 nM' and thought it must be referring to using a torque wrench. Thanks for the information! :)

Yep, I have adjusted the tension of the belt to what looks like 12mm!


// Face palm // I knew I should have gotten a multimeter to test the alternator when this problem started but I didn't get one due to circumstances outside of my control.

So I fully charged my battery and installed the new alternator and the battery light was no longer coming on. Great I thought, but the belt was squealing a lot, so I started trying to find the cause. After about 30 minutes with the engine running, my battery light turned on again, and it turned on as soon as the fan came on. Perhaps the battery light didn't come on at the start because it was fully charged but then came on when it started to run down.

So I then had a closer look at everything. Knowing it can't be the alternator, I followed the alternator belt and noticed that the crankshaft pulley was wobbling, and when it wobbles it looks like it has split apart. That abnormal pulsing sound is still present and I am wondering if it has something to do with the crankshaft pulley.

The alternator belt is spinning the alternator pulley so the alternator must be charging?! But I don't know. I temporarily tightened the belt even more but it didn't make a difference.

The problem was not happening before this abnormal pulsing sound so what ever is causing this sound probably has something to do with it.

I followed the cable from the alternator to the fusebox. It looks all good. I cleaned the alternator wire connector again with WD-40 and scraped the terminals with a metal paper clip, and even sprayed WD-40 on the alternator wire connection in the fusebox, but nothing has helped. I am starting to lose patience with this car, it is wasting my life and I have started having visions again of a tow truck coming to pick it up and taking it to the wreckers!

If anyone thinks the problem may be something else then please let me know!

Also, does anyone know where in the shop manual I can find the procedure for replacing the crankshaft pulley? I have looked but can't find it.

I have taken some more videos of the problem...

Wobbly crankshaft pulley...



Pulsing sound (really noticeable at 34 seconds), and the battery light comes on with fan...

 

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You probably have a bad/misaligned harmonic balancer! That's behind the crank pulley and could definitely cause it to wobble like that, so you were correct in your other thread that you needed to remove it. I don't know that is causing your charging problem - although this is a new/reman alt we're talking about, and there's no way the alternator or A/C is causing the wobble, so it's kind of a dead giveaway here. Isn't that a relief to hear? LMAO! The job itself is honestly not too difficult and is addressed in the manual in detail - most of the difficulty involved is due to its location and logistical concerns on how to get to it. It can be done with the engine in the car - I've done it...but it wasn't a picnic, that's for sure.

28972


This is a force gauge, btw. I use it at work on occasion. It can measure force in either direction (push or pull) and comes with attachments for use. Even dials for different bases of measurement. One of these things probably costs several hundred dollars, that's why none of us own one personally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Interesting. Thanks for the photo of the force gauge. Now that I think of it, I have seen one of those before.

Yeah I have started removing the fender liner to get access to the crankshaft pulley but it started raining so I had to stop. It looks like I have to take off the fender liner, lip and engine splash guard to get to the power steering adjusting bolt and crankshaft pulley. What a pain.

I just ordered a crankshaft pulley from a wrecked 1989 Prelude...


Now I have to get the crankshaft key and a special bolt washer, I'm having trouble finding the washer though. I think I saw somewhere that there is a crankshaft gasket that can be replaced, too.

You said that you have seen the procedure for replacing the crankshaft pulley in the shop manual. I have looked in the manual over and over and over but can't find it. Could you please show me where it is?

 

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Removal of the splash shield made things easier when I was doing this - It's easier to get at from underneath with the car on jackstands as high as you can get them. I'm not sure of an auto, but if it was a manual, you'd have to break the crank bolt loose before you put it in the air - once it's not on the ground anymore, the engine will rotate freely in neutral and fairly easily even in gear. I've never performed this with an automatic transmission, but it's possible that park will function to keep the transmission engaged stationary even when it's up in the air, so it might be something to try. The link to that section of the manual that you put up in the very first post shows you exactly where the power steering adjuster and idler pulley are - loosen the idler first, then take the adjuster loose until you can remove the belt. Likewise with the alt/AC belt. Crankshaft pulley removal is addressed in the section addressing replacing the timing belt, since it has to come off for that procedure. You should not need to buy a new key, a washer for the bolt, or either of the timing guide washers - you should be able to re-use all of your existing hardware if it is not physically damaged or you've lost it already or something. Crank pulleys aren't easy to find anymore, and since they're all used, this harmonic balancer problem could get super frustrating. I hope this "new" pulley isn't just as bad as the old one. There are ways to re-balance that pulley so it can be used again - it's only rubber on the backside, which crumbles and falls away over time leading to unbalance. However, I bet it's not easy for the average layman to do by themselves. It'd be work for an automotive machinist.

The front main seal is behind all of this, which is a lip seal in the oil pump, but I believe replacing it requires more disassembly and is something you would want to do with the engine out of the car (I seem to remember that it requires removal of the crankshaft, but I could be wrong about that). I'll be doing this myself for the rebuild I'm working on, but my engine is already out of the car on a stand in the garage. I haven't completed disassembly of it (been concentrating on the head and the '89 in my profile pic with the work you've seen in my own thread), but logistically speaking, I'm not going to have a problem getting at anything, and I think that's going to be your biggest problem. I really hope this new pulley works out for you, man!
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
So I got the fender liner and front splash guard off today and inspected the crankshaft pulley. It has defused where the rubber is...


I also took off the power steering belt and confirmed that my power steering pump is what is making the noise. This does not surprise me because I am actually in the middle of changing my power steering fluid. I was waiting for the bubbles to settle in the power steering reservoir which is why I killed some time and cleaned my engine bay which is when all of these problems began. I checked the power steering fluid tonight and it is sitting on the low line. Perhaps that is why my power steering pump is making an abnormal noise.

I couldn't remove the power steering pump in accordance with the manual because access to the pulley bolt and adjusting bolt are inaccessible with my convention spanners and ratchet. I had to get it off by removing the power steering top bolt and and loosen the bottom bolt. A real shit design.

I'm really hoping this problem goes away after I change the crankshaft pulley. So there was nothing wrong with my original alternator and I doubt that there is anything wrong with this new remanufactured alternator. The fuses are good. The wiring looks good. All that can be left wrong now is the alternator belt or crankshaft pulley. The belt is cracked like hell which you can see in the video, but the fact the crankshaft pulley is broken makes me think it's that causing the alternator not to charge. Who knows though? Now that I know the crankshaft pulley is not the cause of the noise, I'm wondering how long has the crankshaft pulley has been defused? Perhaps it's been defused for ages but still functions and it's really the cracked up alternator belt causing the alternator not to charge! After all, this problem started after I hosed down my engine bay. Perhaps when the water dried, it dried out the alternator belt? This thought gives me a sick feeling! But then perhaps the water dried out the rubber fusing on the crankshaft pulley?!

My crankshaft pulley arrives next week, let's see what happens. Fuckin cars!
 

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Yeah.....I don't think the pulley should come apart like that in the video. That's bad news. I noticed the outer portion of the pulley that drives the PS pump isn't moving, but your PS pump was making noise? A gritty sounding whine, perhaps? (this means the system is low on fluid, usually). If it's belt squeal, that's a tension issue, or the belt is moving in and out like the inner one and you just can't see it.

The power steering idler bolt to loosen is 14mm. You need a long, box end wrench for it - no socket wrench will fit in between the frame and that pulley. It's literally the tightest spot in the entire engine compartment to try to get a tool into. If all else fails, taking loose the PS mounting bolts will take the belt off, of course, but they're not easy to remove with tension on the belt, and threads can get damaged, etc. When taking the tensioner loose, it's useful to take the cruise control out from behind the PS reservoir and just move it up around the brake master cylinder. It's held to the frame with 3 10mm bolts and is pretty easy to take loose and move without disconnecting anything but an electrical plug and a couple vacuum lines. The cables will bend and flex enough to get it out of your way. With it moved, it's pretty easy to get at the tensioner from the side with, say, a ratcheting wrench. Maybe you can fit a socket in there, but I'm unsure - I didn't try it a couple weeks ago when I took the belts off the '89 at my friend's place, and just used a ratcheting wrench.

There probably really is nothing wrong with the original alternator or the reman. Usually, at least when I've seen bad harmonic balancers in other vehicles, it doesn't necessarily cause the alternator not to charge, but does create the wobble which has as tendency to throw the belt at operating speed (if you think the 'lude is hard to do this on, you should try it on like an 08 Chevy Venture minivan LOL). I have a feeling this is likely the issue - the belt probably won't stay tight for whole revolutions, causing it not to charge. It's moving it, but not at the speed it should be. The belt is certainly in need of replacement, and it's just possible that it's part of the problem as well, but the surging you've experienced is likely from the low-charge situation. My Volvo does the same thing - I'm having some issues with it starting on occasion which I'm still working through. Every time it's too dead to start, it clears the ECU of all the regular settings and has to re-learn through a cooling cycle before it smooths out completely. If we have to use the jump pack to get it running, it surges like that for a little while as the computer figures it all out again. The Honda, despite being 20 years older, is much the same way. I'm not sure why my Volvo is doing this - I personally think that perhaps it needs a new battery - after the bitter cold of this past winter, it wouldn't surprise me. Temperatures hovered at about -20F for almost a month solid, and it may have damaged a cell in the battery....but I haven't had a lot of time to troubleshoot that one yet - my priorities have been elsewhere. It's just possible that I've got similar issues to what you have, so I'll have to check it out over the weekend and make sure my pulley isn't wobbling around like that. ;) My runner lude is also doing similar things to what yours is doing, but since that one isn't getting driven due to the structural issues, it hasn't been high on the priority list. I might have exactly the same thing going on! Again, I'll have to see if I can take a look at it this weekend. I'll keep you posted!

I don't think anything you did caused this directly. The water may have loosened up a bunch of crumbling rubber on the backside of the pulley. It's just old. It happens. Do buy a new belt, though. Either way, that needs to be replaced. Anybody I've ever talked to about a crank pulley moving in and out like that says the rubber on the harmonic balancer is bad, or the thrust bearing in engine on the crank side is bad (and if the latter was the case, your engine would probably be knocking pretty loudly every time you stepped on the gas and the pulley moved). Since yours isn't knocking and the bolt and outer portion of the pulley don't appear to move, I'd say that's not the issue you're having - it's the pulley, not something internal. I'd honestly be surprised if replacing the crank pulley doesn't fix the problem - I bet if you take the alt belt off, that part of the pulley will spin independently of the outer section with a little effort, which is why your alternator is not charging. It's probably only spinning at all because of the inertia of the center section.

Change out the pulley and belts, tension the new ones properly, and we'll see what happens. Good luck, mate!
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 · (Edited)
The power steering pulley bolt is a joke. How is one suppose to torque it once it has been loosened? One needs to remove the engine from the car just to correctly tighten it back up again? Unless there is a way to torque it with a special tool that can fit into that space that I don't know about?

For sure there was nothing wrong with the original alternator. The power steering pump noise coming from above the alternator was just bad timing as my alternator stopped charging at the same time which led me to believe I had washed grease out of an alternator bearing or something, even though they are sealed bearings. I pissed away $130 on the remanufactured alternator. What ever. I'm not myself at the moment.

Well I got the alternator belt off the crankshaft pulley tonight and can confirmed it is the culprit to the alternator not charging. The outer part has complete defused from the rubber.

I have been able to have a closer look at the belt. It's no where near as bad as I thought it was. It will easily last till I get rid of the car.

Perhaps me running the power steering with low fluid caused it's pulley to be harder to turn which in turn put pressure on the crankshaft pulley causing the inner and outer part of it to separate. I didn't fully top up my fluid as my car is parked on an incline which is why I was waiting for the bubbles to settle, to get an idea where it was at and top up a little more before I drive it to a flat road to complete fluid top ups.

I have noticed the engine knocking with all the belts off. Just an observation.

I bet if you take the alt belt off, that part of the pulley will spin independently of the outer section with a little effort, which is why your alternator is not charging. It's probably only spinning at all because of the inertia of the center section.
You mean like this? ;)


You know your cars mate!


So I am not going to buy the special tool to remove the crankshaft pulley bolt and instead will use a hack. I am not going to have a look at hacks tonight as I am tired and need a break from the car but does anyone have any ideas they could share with me?

I also need to know a hack to get it back on again. The replacement crankshaft pulley is from a 1989 Prelude.
 

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The idler pulley is what you're talking about, not the power steering pulley. That bolt doesn't need to be torqued. It just needs to be tight enough so that the idler doesn't move once it's in position. Lol
Hondas in general of this age range sound clickety clackety because of the valve train, and it's perfectly normal. If the thrust bearing was that far worn, it would sound like someone hitting a metal table with a tack hammer. Even people who know absolutely nothing about cars would know something was wrong with it.

Getting the pulley back on is probably going to require an impact wrench. If you don't have access to one, you're likely going to using a big breaker bar with a long extension and a cheater bar handle extension for leverage. Use the reverse process of removal, of course. Put it in park, set the brake, tighten through the port hole in the fender liner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 · (Edited)
Sorry mate, yeah your right, the idler pulley (pulley bolt)! It is suppose to be torqued to 49 nM...


Yeah my valve train clicks. It sounds like it's pinging but it's not. It sounds shit.

I have seen a lot of great hacks to get the crankshaft pulley back on. There was one I was impressed with where you jam a wheel lug with a breaker bar so the wheel-driveshaft-transmission-crankshaft can't turn, but it requires an unusual socket that I don't have. I would be a bit concerned with this hack though by the force on the lug snapping it off.


I want to go with this method instead...

 

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Discussion Starter · #32 · (Edited)
I thought about the wheel-driveshaft-transmission-crankshaft idea like in the video in my previous post and it's not making sense to me. If the crankshaft doesn't move when the transmission is not spinning then how does the engine run when the car isn't moving? What am I missing!?
 

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The crankshaft does move when the engine is running, at all times.

You might actually have to buy/rent the special tool from a parts store or something. I'm not confident that most of the hacks will be relevant to an automatic transmission because of your concerns - the engine will turn over and run while in park. In gear, the only thing preventing it from starting is a safety switch, otherwise you could totally start an automatic while it's in gear. The following came from a mechanic's supplement about automatic transmissions:

"In an automatic transmission there is a ring with teeth on the output shaft of the transmission. When the transmission is shifted into park a lever called the parking pawl is lowered against the ring. If the parking pawl did not land squarely into an opening in the ring the car will roll slightly and there will be a usually an audible click. The parking pawl now holds the output shaft from turning.
Automatic transmission showing parking pawl
Without the engine running an automatic transmission is effectively in neutral in any gear except park. Theoretically with park engaged also applying the parking brake is not necessary unless the car is on a big hill because the parking pawl has more than enough strength to hold the car from rolling. It is a good idea to exercise the parking brake on a car with an automatic so the system does not freeze up.
PS. In a manual it is suggested to place the car in first gear or reverse then engage the parking brake and for good measure curb the wheels. In the event that the parking brake fails (more common than the parking pawl) the engine with the sub one gear ratio will hold the car. The good measure of curbing the wheels will roll the car into the curb in the case that the engine can't hold the car from rolling."

None of this really makes any difference to you - you're going to have to find a way to lock that pulley in place while you tighten it, and perhaps the special tool is the best way to do that.

PS idler pulley: 49 nM is a decent amount (roughly 35 ft/lbs), but it's more than achievable with a 14mm box end wrench. There's no measuring torque at that bolt without at least a crow's foot attachment on your torque tool. I don't have any myself, so I just got it good and snug with my box end wrench. Too tight will damage the bearing, too loose and you won't get any belt tension. Really, the point is just to get it so that it won't move once it's in position.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Nah there is no way the car can accidentally start if left in gear. The car is fuel injected and requires electricity to function which can only be done by starting the car.

Yep, know all about the parking pawl. :)

You make a good theoretical point about not needing to break because of the pawl but I reckon it would snap from the force on the bolt.

That video of the guy jamming his wheel lugs to stop the crankshaft from turning has confused me. How is he able to do that?

Correctly tightening the pulley bolt with a 14mm box end wrench is not possible because the box end wrench doesn't tell you how many nM is has tightened the bolt to. I'm sure your snug fit with the box end wrench will hold the bolt in just fine though. ;)

That crow's foot attachment is awesome! I will be getting one of them one day! Haha but from memory even that crow's foot attachment probably won't reach into the space required to get to the pulley bolt. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
My replacement crankshaft pulley arrived today.

29031


I ran everything under hot water to clear off the dirt. Should I treat the rust with WD-40 on like the belt grooves or would I be wasting my time? Could WD-40 overspray break down the bonding of the rubber and the metal?
 

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It's not my point that was made in that article, although it wasn't clear I was quoting an article since I didn't put quotes around the text of it, and that's my fault. I fixed it. LOL It is my honest opinion that you will probably need the special tool or an impact wrench to tighten that bolt again. No matter what you do, the engine will rotate because it's an automatic. A manual would be physically engaged with the gears and the hacks we've been talking about would work, but an automatic is designed to run while the car is in park, and every other gear would be like neutral without it running.

When I said it's only an ignition safety switch that prevents a person from starting their car in gear with an automatic, I didn't mean by accident - I meant that the switch is there to prevent such a thing, but can be defeated on purpose by someone who knows what they're doing. Most manual cars (of at least the 80s and newer - older vehicles probably didn't have it) have a similar switch that will not allow you to start the car unless the clutch pedal is depressed...and it can equally be defeated; in fact in order to install remote start on a manual, that switch has to be bypassed, because there will be no one in the car to push the clutch in if you're starting it remotely.

Do NOT use WD40 to clean that thing. It might very well assist in delaminating the rubber from the metal, and the rust on the pulley grooves will probably all come off the first time you run the engine. You should also absolutely not be using WD-40 to clean anything electronic, plugs, contacts, any of that. WD-40 is NOT a cleaner and can only damage electronic components. It does not evaporate and will readily soak into PCBs, wiring, rubber grommets; leaves a non-conductive film behind on parts you've used it on, etc. You'd be better off using Brake Kleen if you can't get ahold of Electrical contact cleaner. If the rust bothers you, treat it with some naval jelly before you install it. Otherwise, I'd classify it as a waste of time, because the belt will rub it all out of the grooves. Also....please tell me that both sections of the pulley are there? The picture looks like it's just the section that drives the alternator/ac, but that could just be the angle of the camera. Those pulleys are supposed to be fused as a single piece.

As for the idler pulley bolt, my definition of "correct" regarding the torque is loose on purpose, since I don't have anything that could get between it and the frame that might be able to read torque with any accuracy - even the crow's foot idea is flawed, since in order to do that the foot would have to be longer than normal, which will give you a false torque reading because torque wrenches are designed to function accurately at a certain length. Adding length to it will generate different torque values - it's why you're not supposed to use cheater bars with torque wrenches. The purpose of the pulley is to adjust tension on the belt. That bolt is basically a set-screw and the in/out movement is controlled by the adjuster, so it just needs to be tight enough to prevent the pulley from moving once correct belt tension is achieved. You can take that torque requirement and throw it out the window because Honda didn't provide us with any special torque tools for the application, and I certainly wouldn't buy one to worry about one set bolt like that. LOL Honda no doubt assigns torque value to lots of parts that don't really need it. Lots of companies do, and the one I work for is no different. Of all the torque values that are kept track of, there are probably only a handful that actually really mean anything. Like the bolts that secure the head to the block - that torque value is important to follow. Likewise with the cam caps, exhaust manifold, intake manifold, main bearing caps, etc. On the other hand, I'm almost certain that Honda unnecessarily assigned a torque value to the 3 10mm mounting bolts for the cruise control I took off too, which is pointless.

As for the video, he doesn't show it, but it must be a manual that he's doing this on. That's pretty much verbatim the procedure you would use to do this on a car with a manual transmission. You're correct, it's not good for the wheel studs, but he said himself in the video that he'd forgotten the tool he had for it, so just came up with that in a pinch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
It is my honest opinion that you will probably need the special tool or an impact wrench to tighten that bolt again.
We'll see. I am pretty confidence about the rope hack. I just need to make sure I don't bend the valves.

An impact wrench to tighten the bolt will certainly lead to the crankshaft pulley bolt being over-tightened and if it doesn't sheer it off, it may wear out the key leading to the crankshaft pulley spinning into the timing belt lower cover.

If the rope hack fails then I will get this:



I'm not going to defeat the safety switch. :)


Thanks for the advice on the WD-40. I won't be using it now. Also, thanks for the information that WD-40 is not a cleaning agent. I will still use it to degrease my tools though. :D
I do have electrical contact cleaner, it's called Deoxit D5. It's expensive stuff that I bought for cleaning the fader tracks on my old synthesizer. I used this product on the direction of Roland, so I'll have to check out the cheaper stuff for the car.

Yep, both sections of the pulley are there. You can see the smaller section through the mounting hole. :)

I have to disagree with you about the torque wrench giving inaccurate readings at length. I can't see how using a cheater bar would make any difference with the measurements as it has no load bearing on measuring mechanism. Even an extension for the crow's foot I am skeptical about; every torque wrench I have seen comes with an extension adapter.

In the comment section of the video, the guy said it works for automatics as well. I think he might be wrong.
 

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I think he might be wrong too, though I have never tried it on an auto myself.

Deoxit is a good cleaner for electronic components, and you're right, very expensive for what you get - but as it's aircraft grade stuff, I'm sure there's a reputation there that is well deserved. However, parts stores in general carry regular old electrical contact cleaner (CRC makes the stuff available at O'Reillys here in the States) and that stuff works really well on connectors. In a pinch, medical grade alcohol (70% or greater) is also good for such a use. You want something that evaporates quickly and leaves no residue behind. On that note, WD-40 is also not a degreaser - it will function somewhat as one, as it's a water displacer, so it will dissolve some thicker greases and oily residues....unfortunately, it also leaves its own behind, which is less than ideal. WD-40 is a great anti-corrosion agent - it's the intended primary use, after all. It leaves a film behind that coats the parts treated with it, preventing oxidation. It's the coating it leaves behind that could assist in degrading the harmonic balancer rubber and shortening its life. It will penetrate under such layers and may loosen the bonding. It also functions well as a light lubricant for moving parts - door and trunk hinges, stuff like that - as well as a fairly effective penetrating oil for stuck fasteners. It's not as good as PB Blaster or InForce for that application, but it's better than nothing if its what you have available. It's cheap and easy to find most places, so if you use it as a degreaser for nasty looking parts, I'm sure it's cost effective. LOL

That's how the guys in the calibration room where I work explained the torque wrench principle to me...It's designed to function as a lever of a certain length, and the head portion being the fulcrum end. If you extend the head out a ways with a long crows foot, the fulcrum of the lever changes and it's no longer reading accurate torque at the head. Similarly, a perpendicular extension at the head (like a socket extension) lessens your torque capability because of torsion, the math of which is based on the length and diameter of the extension and its ability to twist - it's why torque adapters for impact wrenches are a thing so that you can measure within some accuracy the torque you're applying to a given fastener without fooling around with the settings on the impact or air supply. Extending the handle end with a cheater bar also can move the fulcrum - the torque reading may be accurate at the head, but the amount of force you're applying to the other end will seem smaller because of the larger turning radius, and the longer the lever is, the more it will flex, which the torque wrench will not read. This isn't necessarily a big deal, but you do have to watch yourself when tightening something that has a high torque, like that crank bolt.

I personally don't think you can overtighten that bolt to the point where it shears off...not with an impact, at any rate - the impact will bounce first because the materials used in the business end are not hardened - it's why you're not supposed to use standard Chrome-Vanadium hand sockets with impact tools - those are hardened and can damage the head of the impact wrench. I've never broken off a fastener of any kind with an impact, ever. I have however, done so many times with hand sockets, and it is surprisingly easy to do. The first time I broke a wheel stud, I was like, "Wow! Don't know my own strength sometimes, I guess!" But I've never broken one with an impact wrench. Mine are all air tools - electric impacts may behave differently, but I still don't think it likely that any tool you own will shear the bolt off when it gets tight unless you're horsing on it by hand. Likewise with the key - the key's only there to hold the pulley in place on the outer circumference of the shaft. The bolt threads internally and shouldn't even touch it - it's just perpendicular clamping force.

Though I've never had to try it before, I can see the rope hack working because that will immobilize the engine without placing something hard where it will do damage. Just be aware that this is an interference motor, so at two points in the combustion cycle the valves occupy the same space the piston will occupy elsewhere in the cycle. Just keep the rope from getting tangled in the valves, and you should do ok. The tool you posted should do the trick too, but it's expensive and I'd hate to spend that much for a tool I'm going to use once.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Haha, yeah, my neighbour has a can from the early 1980's that he sometimes lends me. You can use white vinegar as well to clean contacts, I used it once when a AA battery leaked.

After finishing up working on my car I dump most of my tools in a sink with hot water and laundry detergent and let it sit for 5 minutes, it gets 95% of the grease off. WD-40 is for when cleaning 1 tool only as it's easier than the whole sink deal, I rinse it off with water after of course.

I have broken a bolt once too. One of the bolts on the distributor. It's funny how you don't forget breaking off your first bolt. I still remember how it feels and walking around the hardware store getting a replacement. Put it this way, I have never broken a bolt since. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 · (Edited)
Ok, so I don't like any of the hacks to remove and install the crankshaft pulley bolts so I am going to get a special tool and a breaker bar to remove the 1991 crankshaft pulley and make my own special tool to install the 1989 crankshaft pulley.

My own tool is a flat piece of metal that will have a hole for tightening the crankshaft pulley bolt and two bolts to hold the pulley in place. This is my reference for drilling the flat piece of metal which gives an idea of how the tool will look.

29051
 
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