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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This doesn't have any real pictures at the minute, but I'll add some later so you can understand the procedure better:

You will need:

1/4" or 3/8" Ratchet
1/2" Ratchet or Lug Wrench
10mm Box end wrench
DOT 3 or 4 brake fluid
Penetrating oil
Hammer
Breaker bar in your ratchet sizes ( helpful! )
Turkey Baster
Bleeder container to catch brake fluid from bleeder, or you can make your own

Okay, first thing's first, undo the lugnuts on all 4 wheels, then jack car up and place on 4 jack stands, I usually use the front cross member and rear suspension mounts.

Next, remove the wheels. locate your bleeders, just above the banjo bolts on the caliper.

Open the brake fluid resevoir on the master cylinder, take your turkey baster and suck out as much of the fluid as possible. Store in a used oil jug. Put new brake fluid in up to the max line.

Next, start on your drivers side front wheel. If your bleeder is rusty, as mine were, you will want to spray penetrating oil on it, wait 1 minute, then hit it with a hammer on the top and sides to help break up any rust in the threads. Put your 10mm ratchet/breaker bar on the bleeder, ( USE A SIX POINT SOCKET, I CANNOT STRESS THIS ENOUGH! ) position it so you will be pulling so you don't bark a knuckle if you slip. Grab with both hands and pull sharply to break the bleeder's seal. Once its loose, put your box end wrench over it, attach the bleeder catch can hose, and turn it one full revolution. That will ensure the valve is fully open. Pump the brakes 5-8 times, until clean fluid is seen in the bleeder catch can hose. Close the bleeder up and snug it down. Go in the pattern of front left, front right, rear left, rear right. Always keep the master cylinder topped up, it is a PITA to bleed air from it. After you bleed all four brakes, ensure proper brake operation before replacing wheels.

Tips:

If your bleeder is hard to get off, remove it from the caliper, put antiseize on the threads and get a dustcover for the nipple.

If the bleeder does not come off when you use a breaker bar, it is probably going to break the head off if you try to muscle it. Do not use heat to remove it as you will destroy the caliper. Replace the caliper.

If you break the bleeder, don't try drilling it out. In a pinch, as long as the bleeder doesn't leak, you can bleed at the line, but any driving with a broke bleeder should be to the auto parts store for a new caliper!

Similarly, if I replace calipers, I always antiseize the bleeder. Because it makes sense to.

Pictures to come.
 

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Rev rage had a one man pesticide/fertilizer hand pump container one man bleeder write up. It works well and is cheap. Designed after expensive units. I guess it didn't get posted in here. Also you should keep the brake fluid separate from used oil. Most places won't recycle it if they know. Especially ones that sell it for heating homes etcetera because when you burn it with brake fluid in it, it gives off toxic fumes.

Oh yeah I guess your new to the 3rd gen. The factory shop manual has different recommended sequence for bleeding the brakes then typically thought of. It is diagonal from the rear to the front. I think it is but don't quote me on it, Drivers, left, rear/ passenger front, right,/ passenger rear, right/ driver's front, left. Usdm left hand drive thus the right and left for clarity.
 

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Additionally when you push the pedal while bleeding never push it further than it would normally go while driving. Especially if it has high miles it can damage the seal inside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Rev rage had a one man pesticide/fertilizer hand pump container one man bleeder write up. It works well and is cheap. Designed after expensive units. I guess it didn't get posted in here. Also you should keep the brake fluid separate from used oil. Most places won't recycle it if they know. Especially ones that sell it for heating homes etcetera because when you burn it with brake fluid in it, it gives off toxic fumes.

Oh yeah I guess your new to the 3rd gen. The factory shop manual has different recommended sequence for bleeding the brakes then typically thought of. It is diagonal from the rear to the front. I think it is but don't quote me on it, Drivers, left, rear/ passenger front, right,/ passenger rear, right/ driver's front, left. Usdm left hand drive thus the right and left for clarity.
I always do it in that order just because I find it the easiest. Brake pedal is firmer than a pair of saline boobies. I'm new to owning Hondas but I've worked on them before.

For brake fluid, a use I have for it is killing young poison ivy shoots. Seriously, I eradicated it on the current property I live at in the fall, dug it all up and cut it off and then incinerated it in a wood furnace ( don't worry, its at a high enough heat level that it breaks down the urushiol droplets ) and DOT3/4 brake fluid breaks down in the environment very quickly, so its not harmful as long as you do what I do, which is mix it with some rubbing alcohol, water and put it in a round up can and spray it on all the poison ivy shoots.

I've a background in electrical engineering, chemistry, and mechanical engineering so I'm rather well versed in these topics. I should post a "what to do with random auto chemicals" to discuss what you can and can't mix with WMO and uses for the stuff you can't mix.
 

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Not to get too far off topic, but is there an appropriate way to dispose of mixed coolant and oil?

On another note, it's awesome to see a helpful new member. We haven't had a good one in ages haha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not to get too far off topic, but is there an appropriate way to dispose of mixed coolant and oil?

On another note, it's awesome to see a helpful new member. We haven't had a good one in ages haha.
Thank you.

Honestly to dispose of coolant in oil. I mix it with a LOT of other waste oil, like ATF, gear oil etc and then go to my local autoparts store. Its not so much how much is deposited, but how dilute is it. 10:1 amounts of oil is not going to interfere with burning nearly as much as, say 2:1 amounts of oil:coolant
 

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Not to get too far off topic, but is there an appropriate way to dispose of mixed coolant and oil?
Pour it over the fence into the neighbors yard :eek2: But really, just kidding.

When it comes to brake fluid, we do always just put it into our waste oil tank, our recyclers handle it all from there. So for anyone that doesn't have shop access, I suggest putting it into a separate container then take it to where you normally dispose of oil. If they won't take it, try an automotive shop, we dump fluids for people all the time.

But as far as coolant, you can put it in a bucket (or similar container) and let it sit for a few days. The coolant will sink to the bottom and the oil will float to the the top. Now you can pump either fluid you want depending on how deep you place the pump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
As I said - brake fluid can be disposed of in the ground.
 

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Brake fluid should not be dumped into septic systems, gutters, and storm systems or onto the ground. It should not be disposed of in the trash. Used bake fluid is a hazardous waste and cannot be released into the environment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Used bake fluid is a hazardous waste and cannot be released into the environment.
Are you a chemical engineer? It breaks down in 7 days, shorter than pesticides like Atrazine, and if disposed in the method I describe in my fluid disposal thread, it won't harm any wildlife.

I explicitly explain that auto parts stores won't take it, that mixing it with oil is dangerous, and that pouring it down storm drains is the worst thing you can do. Also, I explain it makes a wondrous weed/poison ivy control agent.
 

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Are you a chemical engineer?
No and I'm hoping you're not either.
It breaks down in 7 days,
No it doesn't.

and if disposed in the method I describe in my fluid disposal thread, it won't harm any wildlife.
Which method is that? The long-worded one in another post? Or the short direct one that most will see?

Just suggesting it can be 'disposed of in the ground' is irresponsible at best.
Lazy people shouldn't be trusted to do 'the right thing'.
So will you explain how it can be disposed of 'in the ground' safely and at no risk whatsoever to anyone or anything else?
 

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I use old coolant for feral cat disposal. A few shallow bowls left in high traffic areas works wonders. They love the stuff, and my neighborhood stays cat free for weeks. :evil smile:














Disclaimer: The above statement was for entertainment purposes only. No animals were harmed in the making of that statement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
No and I'm hoping you're not either.
I am an engineer, but not a chemical one. However, I took several classes on organic chemistry and I can tell you the glycol compounds in brake fluid break down in a week in the presence of water.

Which method is that? The long-worded one in another post? Or the short direct one that most will see?
There's two uses for it: weed control, and the other one in the other post.

Just suggesting it can be 'disposed of in the ground' is irresponsible at best.
Lazy people shouldn't be trusted to do 'the right thing'.
So will you explain how it can be disposed of 'in the ground' safely and at no risk whatsoever to anyone or anything else?
You dig a 1 foot hole, fill it with 6 in of kitty litter, slowly pour the brake fluid in, mix it with your spade, then cover it with soil. The kitty litter will absorb it until it breaks down, not kill the surrounding grass and such.

Atrazine is a neurotoxin and persists in the water for over a year. Brake fluid is composed of glycol compounds that have a high lethal dose to humans, pets etc, in other words you'd need to drink an entire 10oz bottle to even come close to killing yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Most DOT 3 brake fluid is actually a Propylene Glycol-Ester - Esters being much more toxic but much less stable. I say dispose of coolant down the drain if you're on sewer, as I said in my post, because the EPA allows it.
 

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Caliper repair

All,

Just wanted to weigh in on brake servicing. I had a leaky caliper and had to replace the square cut seal. Instead of some of the methods recommended, I removed the caliper from the mount and just pumped the brakes until the piston popped out (had a rag in place to catch it). It worked like a charm, didn't create any air bubbles... just wanted to throw it out there, although this may be a thing people already do.
 

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I drain everything into used oil 5qts then throw the whole thing into the trash, because I pay people to deal with this for me (unfortunately)...

I could see the drain thing actually. Waste water treatment plants use a biological agent that actually enjoys eating glycol. Problem being that if everyone did this, it would exceed the capacity of the available bugs. Also, treatment plants leak.

Also I always started at the back when bleeding because it pulls more dead fluid through quicker.
 
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